Saving rainwater

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"Dan L." wrote

Artesian wells are actually the least expensive type of well to construct. There are a few cities in Michigan that are famous for their artesian wells... check your Yellow Pages and get estimates, you may be pleasantly surprised. It could solve all your poor water problems.
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On Mon, 16 Feb 2009 13:10:16 -0500, "Dan L."

I'm late on this Dan, but I have had this idea in my head for several years, after using this product for it's intended use for five years
Put yer thinking cap on here and do some calculations, etc. Cheap, tough and holds lots and lots of water in the larger sizes. Comes complete with low pressure, high volume pump and cover.
Spinoff of military waterbag technology.
http://www.intexcorp.com/easyset.htm
Charlie
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Hmmm ... I ... I just do not know what to say Charley :)
My thinking cap is on ... I could for a month or two park my old pickup truck back by the garden. Put a water proof liner in the bed. How does the saying go a "Red Neck's Swimming Pool" or "Hot Tub". It might work.
Enjoy Life ... Dan
--
Garden in Zone 5 South East Michigan.

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On Sun, 15 Feb 2009 01:25:45 GMT, "brooklyn1"

I had checked that Web site, but the prices were more than I want to pay.
Persephone.
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That's scary stuff around here. Won't hold up to all the rocky terrain, perforations during installations.
Didn't find any that small. Here's a link for fiberglas septic tank maker... http://www.loomistank.com/fiberglass-septic-tanks.html
--
Dave

CDOs are how we got here.
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Yes, you are absolutely right Victoria, they are *very* strong. It's also not legal to install a 'damaged or repaired' fiberglass septic tank for it's originally intended purpose even if they are technically as good as new so there goes ol brooklyn1's flat tire theory. I only told about the salvaged septic tanks to suggest that people need to look around and see what's available to do the job. I found a very workable and relatively inexpensive solution to my water problem by doing a little thinking outside the box. When I saw "water barrels" selling for $75 a pop I figured there HAD to be a better way. Gardening, if done properly, is conducive to percolating and pondering solutions to problems. ;)
Val
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You can prove your theory?
Certainly you can't install an obviously damaged tank but you certainly can install one that's been properly repaired, the same as one can drive down the interstate on a patched tire. Fiberglass vessels are of laid up constructrion, there is no way to tell whether they're patched... the entire thing brand new is one big patch upon patch upon patch. And if a fiberglass septic tank is damaged so badly that it can't be patched well enough to use as a septic tank than it can't be patched well enough to hold liquid for any purpose. And most all fiberglass septic tanks are designed to rely on the rigidity afforded by being buried totally or in part, brand new they're not safe to use totally above ground... they also need to be buried to protect them from UV and freezing. Typically fiberglass septic tanks don't get buried below grade, preferably a berm is built, of specified materials, that covers and supports the tank. Just two years ago my neighbor across the road built a new house and tried every which way to get around paying the $40,000 it cost to place the tank and leach field etc. into a berm above grade. Where I live the codes have recently become very strict regarding septic system installation but I've never seen any code that says a fiberglass tank cannot have been repaired before installation or after installation. In many instances cesspools are installed, laid up block cesspools are still permited in some areas... many folks still install drywells, you can still buy a simple plastic dry well at Home Depot or make one of a 55 gallon steel drum, or whatever. You can't make a blanket statement saying what the laws are regarding septic systems, every jurisdiction has different codes, and every installation is different... every municipality has different building codes (some have none) so don't go making stuff up.
Where I live there are lots of wetlands, most everyone including moi has more than a few acres of wetlands, talk about strict, now we're taking Federal laws. I never saw a word about repaired fiberglass septic tanks and I happen to keep up on that stuff. I love living with wet lands, not five minutes ago I looked out my window and this is why:
http://i43.tinypic.com/334oiur.jpg
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If using any material exposed to direct sunlight that's sensitive to UV, an appropriate coat of paint will suffice.
To address the fiberglas septic tank installation issues you discuss, and someone else infers not a problem with rocky terrain - http://www.loomistank.com/download/installation/LT_FIBERGLASS_INSTALL.PDF
--
Dave

CDOs are how we got here.
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snipped-for-privacy@NoSpam.com wrote:

Indefinitely if you exclude mosquitos with a functional lid.

No, it may grow some algae if light gets in but that will not harm plants. There is no need to treat it like drinking water.
If by "barrel" you mean 50-100 gallons it will be of very limited use. If you want to support your garden rather than a few pot plants you will need a much bigger tank (1000 gal plus) and to reorganise your roof plumbing to fill it. Depending on the size and layout of your property, the soil and other considerations a ground tank (ie small dam) may be cheaper and more effective. This is quite a complex issue.
David
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On Thu, 12 Feb 2009 13:15:49 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@NoSpam.com wrote:

Are we making mash? Then chlorine is not recommended unless you plan to drink it.
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g'day presephone,
in your conditions you should be seriously looking into buying a rain water tank of substantial capacity, modern tanks are sealed so as only water gets in nothing else.
i have a tank and i use drums/barrels as well all mine are sealed ie.,. not open topped like many drums i see in pic's from the USA, so again no mosquito's can get in. there is a pic or 2 on our site showing our setup.
our rainwater tank is 25k litre capacity, which makes us sufficient in water in our drought.
On Thu, 12 Feb 2009 13:15:49 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@NoSpam.com wrote: snipped With peace and brightest of blessings,
len & bev
-- "Be Content With What You Have And May You Find Serenity and Tranquillity In A World That You May Not Understand."
http://www.lensgarden.com.au /
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