Sausage recipes #1

Fresh Kielbasa
Makes 5 pounds
Everyone in Eastern Europe seems to have a variation on this sausage. Poland is most famous for their version, but I think this Lithuanian recipe from Bill Daileda of Saint Casmir's will keep all of Eastern Europe happy. It is the best that I have come across.
Ingredients:
1 ½ tablespoons salt ½ tablespoon ground allspice ¼ teaspoon garlic powder ½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper ½ teaspoon MSG (optional)
1 pound beef chuck, cut into large pieces 4 pounds pork butt, cut into large pieces 1 ¼ pounds fresh pork fatback cut into large pieces
1/2 cup cold water Sausage casings, about 14 feet, 1 inch in diameter
Mix all the spices in a small jar. Shake well to mix them.
Grind the meats and the fatback coarsely in a meat grinder or food processor. Place the mixture in a bowl. Add the seasonings and mix thoroughly through the meat. Mix in the cold water, which will make the meat easier to stuff.
Stuff the mixture into casings
From: Frugal Gourmet "On Our Immigrant Ancestors"
Smoked Kielbasa
This is Bill Daileda's version of smoked sausage, and it is a bit closer to what most Americans know as Polish sausage. It is Lithuanian in origin, however, and not as fatty as that stuff you get from the supermarket.
Ingredients:
1/2 teaspoon MSG (optional) 1/2 teaspoon mustard seeds 3/4 tablespoon curing salt(made by Morton's and available in specialty shops or supermarkets) 1 /2 tablespoons salt 1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 1/2 tablespoon ground allspice 1/2 cup cold water 1/2 teaspoon garlic powder
4 pounds pork butt, coarsely ground 1 pound beef, coarsely ground
To prepare, follow the directions for the fresh kielbasa, but then tie the stuffed casings into rings and smoke them.
Romanian Sausages Mititei Makes 12 sausages
Pearl Mailath, a Romanian friend in Indiana, invited us into her home for a real Romanian meal. This was before Romania erupted into what we hope will be independence. As she cooked these delicious sausages, we talked politics. I think the discussion made the sausages taste even better. These are great cooked on the outdoor grill.
Ingredients: 4 5 cloves garlic, peeled 1 1/2 teaspoons salt 1/4 cup water    1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 1/2 teaspoon dried thyme, whole 1 teaspoon baking soda 1/2 teaspoon dried basil 1/2 cup Beef Stock or use canned
2/3 pound coarsely ground pork 1 pound ground chuck
Crush the garlic well in the water, using a fork. Stir in the meat, baking soda, seasonings, and garlic puree together. Add Beef Stock and mix well.
For each sausage, take 1/3 cup of the meat mixture, and roll between the palms of your hands into a sausage shape about 4 inches long. Place sausages side by side in a container and cover. Refrigerate overnight so the flavors can blend.
These are excellent on the grill. They may also be broiled or baked in the oven.
Broil the sausages about 3 minutes per side until cooked through and browned.
HINT: WHEN HAND ROLLING SAUSAGES or meatballs of any kind, keep a small bowl of water near you so that you can keep your hands a bit wet. This way, the meat will not stick to your hands.
From: The Frugal Gourmet "Our Immigrant Ancestors" Italian Sausage with Lemon
Makes a little over 2 pounds
Lemon is just great with pork, and this sausage with lemon is delightful. It is not heavy but rather very refreshing.
2 pounds pork butt, coarsely ground 1/4 pound pork fat, coarsely ground 1 tablespoon freshly ground fennel seed 1 tablespoon dried parsley 3 cloves garlic, crushed 1 teaspoon salt 4 tablespoons dry white wine 2 tablespoons freshly grated lemon peel
Mix all the ingredients together.
Let stand for 1 hour and mix again. Stuff into casings.
Italian Sausage, Sicilian Style
Makes 2 pounds
This will be better than any sausage you can find in a market, except perhaps Fretta Brothers in New Jersey and Esposito's in Philadelphia. Well, there are some fine companies in Seattle also, Fresh made sausage, homemade, is a forgotten thing in our culture and I think that is a shame.
2 pounds lean pork butt, coarsely ground 1/4 pound pork fat, coarsely ground 1 tablespoon coarsely ground fennel seed 2 bay leaves, crushed 1 tablespoon dried parsley 3 cloves garlic, crushed 1/8 teaspoon dried hot red pepper flakes 1 teaspoon of salt 1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper 4 tablespoons dry white wine
Mix all the ingredients together. Let stand one hour.
Mix again and stuff into casings.
Another variation is to omit the parsley and white wine, but add 1/2 cup of red wine.
Source: The Frugal Gourmet Cooks Italian
Italian Sausage With Parsley And Cheese
Makes a little over 2 pounds
This is a bit lighter than the sausages with red pepper flakes and I think this is a perfect sausage for a nice dinner with friends.
2 pounds pork butt, coarsely ground 1/4 pound pork fat, coarsely ground 3 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley 3 cloves garlic, crushed 1 teaspoon salt 1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 4 tablespoons dry white wine 1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese
Put all the ingredients together, and mix them well. Let rest an hour and mix again. Stuff into casings.
Source: The Frugal Gourmet Cooks Italian
Italian Cheese and Red Wine Sausage
You will enjoy this variation on the plain Italian pork sausage. The addition of cheese and wine raises this sausage to dinner table conversation.
Ingredients: 4 pounds boneless pork, shoulder or butt 1 tablespoon coarse ground fennel seed 2 bay leaves, crushed 3 tablespoons chopped parsley 5 garlic cloves, crushed 1/2 teaspoon dried red pepper flakes 3 teaspoons salt 1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 1 cup grated Parmesan or Romano cheese 3/4 Cup dry red wine 4 yards sausage casings Olive oil for cooking
Grind the meat using the coarse blade.
Mix all ingredients together and allow the mixture to sit for 1 hour before stuffing into casings.
To cook, place in a frying pan with a tiny bit of olive oil and just enough water to cover the bottom of the pan. Cover and cook until the water evaporates. Then, continue to brown, turning once.
Use throughout the book where Italian sausages are called for.
Makes 4 pounds.
Source: The Frugal Gourmet Cooks with Wine Homemade Pork Sausage Ingredients:
One 5 pound Boston butt or meat scraps when you butcher hogs 2 tablespoons minced garlic 3 cups finely chopped onion Salt to taste Ground cayenne pepper to taste 1 1/2 cups finely chopped green onions 1 tablespoon dried mint or other seasonings to taste
Using a meat grinder, finely grind together the meat and the fat into a large bowl.
Mix in the onions, green onions, garlic, salt, pepper, mint, and any other seasonings you would like to use. Using the mixing spoons Mother Nature gave you, your hands, mix all the ingredients together.
I usually fry a patty to test for seasonings and because by that time I'm hungry. Then pass the mixture through the meat grinder again to mix very well.
You can freeze this in patties with waxed paper in between or stuff into casings.
Source: Justin Wilson's "Homegrown Louisiana Cookin'"
Boudin Ingredients: 2 1/2 pounds pork butt, cut into 1 inch cubes 1 pound pork liver, rinsed in cool water 2 quarts water 1 cup coarsely chopped onions 1/2 cup coarsely chopped bell peppers 1/2 cup coarsely chopped celery 41/4 teaspoons salt 21/2 teaspoons cayenne 11/2 teaspoons freshly ground black pepper 1 cup chopped parsley 1 cup chopped green onions, green parts only 6 cups cooked medium grain white rice
A popular sausage made with bits of     pork, fluffy white rice, and seasonings is the breakfast choice in Acadiana. Wrapped in a paper napkin or tucked into a slice of bread and washed down with a cup of dark coffee, it carries you through the morning.
It's not necessary to stuff the sausage into casings. You can plunk a heaping spoonful of the mixture on a thick slice of Home Style French Bread (page 286) or any bread for that matter, not just for breakfast, but any time. I like to drizzle some Steen's 100 % Pure Cane Syrup on it too. The mark of a good boudin is lots of chopped parsley and green onions.
1. Put the pork, liver, water, onions, bell peppers, celery, 1 teaspoon of the salt, 1/4 teaspoon of the cayenne, and 1/4 teaspoon of the black pepper in a large heavy pot. Bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce the heat and simmer for about 11/2 hours, or until the pork and liver are tender. Remove from the heat and drain, reserving 11/2 cups of the broth.
2. Grind the pork and liver together with 1/2 cup of the parsley and 1/2 cup of the green onions in a meat grinder fitted with a 1/4 inch die. Or, put the pork and liver together with 1/2 cup of the parsley and 1/4 CUP of the green onions in a food processor fitted with a metal blade and pulse several times to coarsely grind the mixture. It should not be pureed into a paste.
3. Transfer to a large mixing bowl. Add the rice, the remaining salt, cayenne, black pepper, parsley, and green onion and mix well. Add the broth, 1/2 cup at a time and mix thoroughly
4. Either stuff the mixture into prepared 1 1/2 inch diameter casings and make 3 inch links.
5. Serve warm. The sausage can be reheated in a 325° oven.
Andouille Sausage
Andouille, Louisiana's famous sausage, is used in gumbos, jambalayas, and dressings. It gives pizzazz to any dish. Andouille is a smoked sausage; if you don't have a smoker, use a kettle grill. I use both garlic powder and fresh garlic to intensify the flavor.
1 boneless pork butt, cut into 1 inch cubes (about 5 pounds) 2 teaspoons freshly ground black pepper 1/2 cup Rustic Rub 1 teaspoon ground cumin 1 1/2 teaspoons chili powder 1 1/2 teaspoons crushed red pepper 1/4 cup paprika 2 teaspoons garlic powder 1 1/2 teaspoons file powder 1/4 cup chopped garlic
1. Put the pork and the rest of the ingredients in a large bowl, tossing to coat the meat evenly. Cover and refrigerate for at least 24 hours.
2. Remove from the refrigerator and put the mixture through a meat grinder using a 1/2 inch die. Or, coarsely grind the meat in a food processor fitted with the metal blade.
3. Stuff the mixture into the prepared 11/2 inch diameter casings, each piece about 10 inches long. It can be frozen indefinitely.
About 5 pounds
Source: Emeril Lagasse "Louisiana Real & Rustic"
Fred's Andouille Sausage
Ingredients: 1 1/2 yds large sausage casing (about 2-3; wide) 4 pounds lean fresh pork 2 pounds pork fat 3 1/3 tablespoons garlic cloves - finely minced 2 tablespoons salt - NOT iodized 1 tablespoon black pepper - freshly ground 1 teaspoon cayenne 1 teaspoon chili powder 1/2 teaspoon mace 1/2 teaspoon allspice 1 tablespoon thyme - minced 1 tablespoon marjoram - minced 1 tablespoon paprika 1/4 teaspoon bay leaf - ground 1/4 teaspoon sage 5 teaspoons liquid hickory smoke
Andouille was a great favorite in nineteenth-century New Orleans. This thick Cajun sausage is made with lean pork and pork fat and lots of garlic. Sliced about 1/2 inch thick and grilled, it makes a delightful appetizer. It is also used in a superb oyster and Andouille gumbo popular in Laplace, a Cajun town about 30 miles from New Orleans that calls itself the Andouille Capital of the World.
Cut the meat and fat into chunks about 1/2 inch across and pass once through the coarse blade of the meat grinder. Combine the pork with the remaining ingredients in a large bowl and mix well with a wooden spoon.
Cut the casings into 26 inch lengths and stuff as follows: Tie a knot in each piece of casing about 2 inches from one end. Fit the open end over the tip of the sausage stuffer and slide it to about 1 inch from the wide end. Push the rest of the casing onto the stuffer until the top touches the knot
Age at least overnight, then smoke for several hours using pecan, hickory or ash. Throw anything sweet, such as cane sugar or syrup, raw sugar, molasses, sugar cane or brown sugar on the wood before lighting.
To cook, slice the Andouille 1/2 inch thick and grill in a hot skillet with no water for about 12 minutes on each side, until brown and crisp at the edges.
Yield:(about 6 pounds of 20 inch sausage, 3 to 3 1/2 inches thick)
Source: Cajun Fred
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Looking for my great Uncle Bill's recipe to show my girlfriend... I happened upon this fed... Thanks..and I agree hebm had the best meats..
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote in rec.food.cooking:

We can't find that specific recipe but ehre is mine.
MMMMM----- Recipe via Meal-Master (tm) v8.05 Title: Xxcarol's sausage seasoning Categories: Xxcarol, Sausage Yield: 1 Servings 2 ts Salt 2 ts Anise seed 1 ts Black pepper 1 ts Oregano 1 ts Ginger 1 ts Thyme 1 ts Garlic powder 1/2 ts Onion powder 3/4 ts Hot hungarian paprika Hi all, this mix can be doubled and tripled and stored in a jar for use. Add this to ground pork, mix well. I normally add about 1 TB to a 1.5lb of ground pork but taste test that to see if it's more than you want. I make it into patties and freeze as is to cook when ready. From the VB Kitchen of xxcarol: typed up 8Mar16 MMMMM
--


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On 2016-03-09 00:39:58 +0000, cshenk said:

I have started producing my own breakfast sausage over the past year and have tried a few. I'll be trying yours.
I'm curious how you "taste test" raw pork with seasoning to see if the seasoning is correct.
Another curiousity: Where do you buy non-lean ground pork? I find a lot of it shrink-wrapped in supermarkets but always proudly labeled "lean". When I find it without that label, and when it looks like it has more fat on it, I buy it. But I can never remember where it was. The "lean pork" I've tried makes sausages that's hard as a brick.
I've asked a few butchers if I could get something other than lean pork, but butchers these days only seem to be the stock-boys for meat packaged elsewhere. So they give me the basic Wal-Mart/Target response: "Uh... if we have it, it would be over there..." with a sweeping gesture that means "somewhere in the store".
Having fallen for the "search for yourself to see if we have it or not" approach, I've taken to responding quickly with: "Could you please put your hand on it?" To which they usually flounce over and begin looking for it frequenly asking again, "What was it you wanted, again?"
Sorry for the digression...
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"gtr" wrote in message

You make a small sample patty, slap it in a skillet, taste, and adjust mixture as necessary. Not rocket science.

Ground pork in my markets comes in trays, fresh ground in store, usually marked 80% lean. It's just ground pork shoulder and trimmings from pork loin. I stopped grinding my own because I can pick out a pork butt and have them grind it for me on the very coarse plate, which is perfect because mixing the seasoning mixture in brings it to the exact right slightly stringy texture.

I don't know who you thought you were asking but they weren't butchers or meatcutters, they were flunkies. Sounds like all you have is pre-packaged crap from some central facility. If they don't process meat in-store where you shop you should consider a better store.
MartyB
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On 2016-03-13 23:17:54 +0000, Nunya Bidnits said:

Good info, provided I can find an operational butcher. Do you have them throw pork loin trimming in there when you're having them grind it?

I don't have a "regular" shop for such things, since I can manage to get anything out of the butchers. Stater Brothers has the rep around here (SoCal) for having the finest meat. I went there a couple of weeks ago and asked about pork, they said it was all shrink-wrapped "over there".
I notice in one particularly skimpy Ralph's that the only things the "butchers" seem to do is fiddle with prepping fish and marinated meats-on-a-stick and similar. Most meat sections are now quite loaded with marinated/sauced chicken/beef for immediate use for dinner tonight.
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On 2016-03-14 21:39:03 +0000, gtr said:

I was passing Whole Foods today on the way home today and stopped by. Asked if they could grind me some pork shoulder for sausage, maybe throw some fat trimmings in to sap the lean rating. He picked up a 2.5 pound block of shoulder and showed me the fat that was in it, and he'd looked fatty enough.
He said he'd been grinding beef today, and did that matter. I said no. He said great because otherwise it would take about 30 minutes to clean it, and he didn't have that kind of leisure time. So now maybe I know one of the tricks of getting some fresh ground pork--not complaing about a little bit of beef in there.

Since Stater Bros. is cheaper and way closer, I'll see if I can navigate this. The wife suggest Northgate, a Mexicano supermarket chain that has a gargantuan meat department and live butchers. Between her Spanish and the limited discussion we would likely have, maybe that will be the place for me.
I also picked up a whole chicken and tomorrow, after making sausage, I will either smoke it or roast it in the slow cooker, neither of which I've attempted before.
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On 3/15/2016 7:04 PM, gtr wrote:

Uh... you don't want a butcher who will readily grind multiple types of meat without cleaning the grinder first! That's the first sign of a lazy butcher. Or a consumer in a rush who doesn't care what they eat.
Jill
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gtr wrote:

Do I really need to say it. . .
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