Safe Mulch for Area with Artillery Fungus

Our lot was originally covered with deep chopped wood mulch which developed artillery fungus. We removed the mulch and that has eliminated the problem as far as spattering goes, but with no mulch on the garden and foundation plantings both of which are quite large I'm spending far too much time weeding.
I'd like to put a few inches of SOMETHING on these beds to keep down weeds, but because artillery fungus can stay alive for many years, it has to be something that won't get it going again.
Anyone here familiar with this problem and have solutions?
The local landscaping people play very dumb when you ask about it, probably because they've been making the problem worse for years with their heavy use of mulch. The fungus problem isn't just mine, a lot of people in my area have developed it recently, so these landscapers just pretend they have never heard about it when you try to discuss it!
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I would bet you used fresh chips that still had living parenchyma cells. The more you compost the wood chips the less likely you are to get A.F..
Composted wood chips and leaves are something I recommend and apply often. We have had no problem with A.F. The mulch we use is about two years old.

A.F. has to do with the symplast in the fresh chips. Get wood chip mulch, not bark mulch, that has composted for two years and you will not have a problem. Many commercial mulch out fits push the materials out maybe too soon.

I have mulch instructions here which where obtained directly from a mycologist.
Mulching - http://home.ccil.org/~treeman/sub3.html and http://www.treedictionary.com/DICT2003/M/ Look up "Mulch"
The fungus problem isn't just mine, a lot of

Most landscapers in my area use whatever mulch the commercial outfits are selling. My source is a very composted mix of wood chips and leaves. BTW the wood is important because composted wood is xthe substrate for the bas of the food web in a forest. The mycorrhizal fungi. More on the chemistry of mulch can be found here: http://www.treedictionary.com/DICT2003/shigo/CHEM.html
http://www.treedictionary.com/DICT2003/shigo/21st.html
http://www.treedictionary.com/DICT2003/shigo/RHIZO.html
http://www.treedictionary.com/DICT2003/shigo/CANKER.html
Ignorance of tree biology has been, and still is, the major cause of tree problems worldwide.
http://www.treedictionary.com/DICT2003/mulchinstruction/mulch.html
Sincerely, John A. Keslick, Jr. Arborist http://home.ccil.org/~treeman and www.treedictionary.com Beware of so-called tree experts who do not understand tree biology. Storms, fires, floods, earthquakes, and volcanic eruptions keep reminding us that we are not the boss.
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Jenny
OK, let me get honest. In 1991, out of the ignorance of tree biology, I was removing turf and applying fresh chips. By removing the turf roots, I was also removing the trees non-woody absorbing roots. Turf roots grow deeper than tree non-woody roots. Then I was applying fresh chips. Just trim the tree and place the chips back around the tree. Great idea, right? NOT! I was then in a formal tree biology workshop when one of the most renown mycologist worldwide pulled me aside and said "NOT FRESH CHIPS"! I then stopped and began searching compost piles for chips at least "one year" old. Sadly enough one of my 1991 fresh chips and turf removing jobs was at my parents house (J. Maple). The tree today is in a state of decline and I believe I am the one at fought.
Fresh chips have living parenchyma cells which contain protoplasm. When we chip a branch with a symplast we smear the protoplasm all over the place. This attracts undesirables which can and do, do nasty things to trees below as well as above ground. That is why I do not use fresh chips. Be believe they can incite a disease. A disease is of the living. A disease is a process that decreases the order and energy of a living system to the point of strain. A disease is an abnormal physiological process that causes injury or death. Strain is not reversible, stress is. You take a slinky and stretch it out and it returns to its original shape (STRESS). Now you pull that slinky so far it does not return to its original shape (STRAIN).
Oh, well, I was one of those landscapers digging out tree roots and applying fresh chips in 1991. Not any more.
Sincerely, John A. Keslick, Jr. Arborist http://home.ccil.org/~treeman and www.treedictionary.com Beware of so-called tree experts who do not understand tree biology. Storms, fires, floods, earthquakes, and volcanic eruptions keep reminding us that we are not the boss.
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How we use wood chip are similar. New piles are given a year to rest. These are then placed on our walking paths. We apply energy to the paths by walking on them. Then when black and rich we dig out and spread about then redo the cycle which takes about 3 years. We like pine chips I guess because most here are oak.
Upside lots of worms but also lots of moles and voles.
Bill
--

S Jersey USA Zone 5 Shade
http://www.ocutech.com/ High tech Vison aid
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Then when black and rich we dig out and

Bill
This new black material is correctly called "new soil". When nurse logs break down the end result is new soil.
Sincerely, John A. Keslick, Jr. Arborist http://home.ccil.org/~treeman and www.treedictionary.com Beware of so-called tree experts who do not understand tree biology. Storms, fires, floods, earthquakes, and volcanic eruptions keep reminding us that we are not the boss.
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