rust spots on my pear tree

Hi, first time I'v 'posted', and i need your help! Moved into our ne
house three weeks ago, has a large established garden, and we dont kno anything about gardening, so i will be picking your brains quite often But the thing i am worried about at the moment is, we have a pear tre and all of its leaves are coverd with rust spots. does this mean tha the tree has to come down? should i call a tree surgen? can they b trusted to give me the correct advice? The pear tree is close to othe trees, hedges & rose bushes which are not affected. Any advice? Thank
-- Owen
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Leave the tree alone until you find out what is really causing it. The rust problems I have had didn't kill any of the trees, but I did cut down two cedar trees that were growing pretty close to the apple, pear, and peach trees.
I would call the county extension office (if you live in the U.S.) and have an agent come out and look at what you have. Otherwise contact your local college (if they have an agriculture division), and ask for their help.
Dwayne

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Dwayne wrote:

Just for the record, the problem comes from certain Juniper varieties, of which the Red Cedar (misnamed) belongs. The offending spores can travel miles to your fruit trees, but if the offending Junipers are closeby, you will see ugly galls on them, a consequence of the apple cedar rust disease
Here is a good web reference on the disease:
http://plantclinic.cornell.edu/FactSheets/cedar-applerust/cedar-applerust.htm
I too had two Red Cedars very close to my apple trees and tried to control it
with fungicides. The result was a reduction of the problem, but it never went away. I removed the two Red Cedars. If the offending Junipers are on your neighbor's lots, there is not much you can do except try to reduce the effect with fungicides.
Sherwin

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at least rust spots are better than "squirrel bodies". they ate all the developing pears already. damn squirrels. Ingrid
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There are a couple of possibilities: one is a rust fungus, the other is a mite. No, don't take the tree down. Mostly it's a cosmetic issue for most home gardeners, but if you don't mind spraying and/or removing the alternate hosts of the rust fungus, you can keep it damped down nicely most years.
http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/PMG/r603400611.html http://web1.msue.msu.edu/vanburen/fprmite.htm https://www.rhs.org.uk/ advice/profiles1001/pear_rust.asp http://plant-disease.ippc.orst.edu/disease.cfm?RecordID 5 http://plant-disease.ippc.orst.edu/disease.cfm?RecordID 1 http://ipm.osu.edu/element/pear.htm
I just trim rusted pears with a paring knife... that's my control. <g>
Kay
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