Rural Irrigation/Remote Faucets Methods ??

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Yep. I'm in mid winter now in the sthn hemisphere and since it's been the driest June for decades, I've currently got my low pressure sprinkers running on my asparagus bed.
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wrote:

Being so "cheap"inexpensive (as you say) I can't imagine anyone painting plastic tubing rather than occasionally replacing a portion... and it's not like it's going to deteriorate from UV within a short time... if not abused by kinking and driving vehicles over PVC it will last well over 10 years outdoors (no one paints their PVC drip systems either).
And no one would use glue for an irrigation system, every professionally installed system I've ever seen, and I've seen a lot of them and installed several myself, holds it all together with stainless steel crimp clamps, not screw type hose clamps, they use a stainless steel ring and crimping tool (fast, inexpensive, and neat - screw type hose clamps are expensive, difficult to work in dirt, and present a hazard due to the loose end). Gluing makes it difficult to make changes/repairs. http://www.sprinklerwarehouse.com/Stainless-Steel-Crimp-Clamps-s/189.htm
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Use drip irrigation!
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"Fascism should more properly be called corporatism because it is the
merger of state and corporate power." - Benito Mussolini.
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thanks for all the helpful posts....... I think that the 1 inch polypipe is the way to go !!
James
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James wrote:

James
Could I make a couple of suggestions.
Don't change nyms from one part of a thread to another, nobody will know that you are the OP.
Answer some of the questions and provide more information. You haven't said where the water is coming from or how much you need at the destination. You haven't given us enough to make a guess if 1" polypipe will in fact be adequate. You don't want to go to the trouble of buying and laying the pipe to discover that it doesn't work.
If the inlet pressure is not very high 1" may be too narrow to give the outlet flow you want, if it is going up hill you might get a tiny flow at the outlet or none at all. Also 1" has a tendency to kink and get flattened very easily. If using 1" DON'T use push fittings (bayonet fittings) they will pop off all the time if put under pressure, use the more expensive fittings that clamp the pipe with a nut.
A knowledgeable irrigation equipment supplier will be able to advise you correctly, whether such is available near you is another issue.
David
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Thanks David, and the others. First, I don't know what a "nym" is, but sorry....
My faucets at the cabin are based on the cabin water system, which is a well, with a pressure tank in the basement. I get good pressure (60 psi), and the poly pipe will not go uphill.
As for drilling a new well, come on guys, I am talking about watering a few plants and bushes, I just dont' want to constantly drag hoses around. That is all that this is about. I do appreciate all the help, and I think that the polypipe is my best bet, although David's last comments may make me consider smaller, perhaps 3/4 inch. BTW, I don't need much pressure at the end, just enough to do some light watering.
James
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"James" wrote:

For what you describe it would be asinine to install a grid of piping all over six acres... your idea is way over kill, it's beyond over kill, it's as stupid as stupid gets... you're not growing crops. And with shrubs and trees once they're established it's not a good idea to water them unless there is a protracted dry spell or young plants won't develop a strong deep root system... when properly planted and mulched you really shouldn't need to water such plants after the first growing season, unless as I've said, there's a real dry spell... and native wildflowers need no watering, most do better if not watered. A newly planted sapling/shrub doesn't need much watering, five gallons once a week is all, and that's if it doesn't rain. And you don't want to water fast and heavy, you want to water slowly, so it can sink in and not run off. And from experience I can tell you that it never fails, right after you finish a whole lot of watering because everything is so dry the sky opens up and there's a deluge. All you need is a garden tractor, a cart, and a bunch of buckets, a riding lawn mower will do for occasional water hauling. And with six acres a tractor and cart is manditory to save your legs, it will probably get used every day hauling you and a mess of tools and materials to do some project, but you'll hardly ever water that smattering of plants, once growing probably never. I were you I'd be much more concerned about critters eating your plants... and if you water you'll attract more critters, critters would much rather dine on the juiciest plants. Most critters are nocturnal, while you're sleeping they'll be ferreting out those nice moist soft spots you left them, they will dig down and eat your plant's roots, you won't even know until one day you notice your plant is dying. Oh well, most everyone learns the hard way.
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James wrote:

You started of as James Nipper now you are just James

I was suggesting that 1" could be too small not too big. 3/4" will flatten and kink more than 1" and has about half the capacity. It's the area of the pipe cross section that is important so the capacity varies as the square of the diameter. Go see that irrigation specialist.
D
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Agree that 1" is the minimum for the length of run he's working on. No reason to use anything smaller, the 1" is cheap and readily available.
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On Sat, 2 Jul 2011 17:30:45 +1000, "David Hare-Scott"

All an irrigation specialist needs to know is his well capacity and exit pipe diameter.. I seriously doubt his little cabin's water system can accomodate more than 3/4" outlet piping.
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On Jul 2, 10:57am, Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:

You are such a complete moron it isn't even funny. Have you seen many wells with a 3/4 inch connection?
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wrote:

I don't think he has seen _any_ plumbing except the spigot next to his trailer house.
Harry K
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wrote:

Why not set up a system for gravity flow irrigation, like the farmers that grow rice have? All you need is a laser level and some sheet plastic for ditch liners. Or if you simply prefer to spend money, have a small well drilled at the site needing the water. Then a couple of 100' hoses will serve any part of the acreage.
Joe
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You slip that in so nonchalantly... there is no such thing as drilling a small well on the cheap.
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Investigate underground piping, and associated valves. There is one that opens a valve in the ground below freezing level, and when the water is turned off, drains the water in the stand pipe to keep it from freezing. No need to totally drain the lines if you put them in deep enough. Not sure of their name, but I have seen lots of them in freezing country. They are red, and have a crooked handle top.
Steve
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That would be one hell of a project, running pipe below the frost line through mostly wooded areas. Around here, even if it's just open space, poly pipe is just pulled to bury it, almost never buried 3 ft deep, for obvious reasons. You just blow it out with a compressor at the end of the season. That's what is done with almost all the lawn irrigation systems. With some small percentage the pitch allows for self-draining.
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Those work like frost proof hose bibs coming through a basement foundation, the warmth of the basement prevents freezing because the valve stem is long enough to reach through the foundation wall to the valve that is actually inside the basement... I have four of them in my house... they work well providing they are pitched downward so they drain when the valve is closed... costs about four times as much as an ordinary hose bib, maybe $30 for a 1/2" supply line. Farmers use the type you're talking about, the warmer ground keeps them from freezing... the valve portion is down below the frost line with a very long valve stem... they are quite expensive, especially as pipe diameter increases... they need to be blown out before the first hard frost. There's another type that municipal water companys install at the curb in cold climes, they are way down in a vault that's installed past the frost line, with a long handled wrench to operate the valve, again very expensive.
http://www.theplumbinginfo.com/troubleshooting/frost-proof-hose-bib-and-spigot-2 /
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On 7/2/2011 6:14 AM, Steve B wrote:

They are called Frost Free Yard Hydrant. You have to remember to surround the bottom of them with coarse rock to give the water someplace to drain.
(Amazon.com product link shortened)
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