Rural Irrigation/Remote Faucets Methods ??

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"Bob F" wrote:

You had better put down that sudz.. you don't know the difference between pressure and volume.
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On Jun 30, 9:12 am, Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:

Because friction in the pipe will reduce pressure by a bunch and watering relies on flow, which needs pressure. Again we a discussing this without the needed information. Rise? Drop? initial pressure?
Harry K
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On Fri, 1 Jul 2011 07:22:22 -0700 (PDT), Harry K

A "bunch"... is that universally recognized scientific nomenclature? Internal turbulence does not occur to any appreciable degree in typical hard pipe, especially not with smooth plastic irrigation tubing. Fire hose is coarsely woven cloth so is rough and does cause turbulence but still reduction in volume is negligible considering the very high pressure pumps used for fire fighting... were it presenting a water volume problem you could bet your bippee that fire fighters would use something else. I can't imagine anyone using fire hose to water their garden. However gals like fire fighters watering their gardens because of their big rough hoses with all their volume and high pressure... and especially how they fold up so neatly for storage in their drawers. LOL-LOL
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On Jul 1, 9:58 am, Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:

Stretch out 500 ft of hose under 60psi and see what you have at the end when the water is running.
Harry K
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On Fri, 1 Jul 2011 21:55:00 -0700 (PDT), Harry K

I've done that occasionally... just as much volume exits 100' 200', 300' 400' as 500' or more, so long as the hose is not kinked/flattened or otherwise constricted or run up hill whatever volume enters exits... I'm positive you've never actually done what you suggest, except tinkling with your tiny 2" fuse. What people don't realize is that their hose bib valve is what dictates volume.. if your hose bib is supplied by 1/2" copper using 5/8" hose won't supply any more volume than a 1/2" hose, except for the first couple seconds untill the little more volume in the larger hose is expelled, kinda like the first burst or pressure from a pressurized hose laying out in the hot sun... a very brief surge. And most folks do have 1/2" domestic water plumbing in their homes to each outlet... then the only benefits of using 5/8' garden hose is that its larger diameter and wall thickness is much less prone to kinking/collapsing and has a longer life than 1/2" hose. It's silly to buy 3/4" garden hose for the typical residence, it offers no benefit, it won't produce more volume and will be heavy/clumsy, and will quickly fill your hose reel, not to mention being more costly for nothing... 3/4" hose probably can't be coiled into a small enough diameter to fit the typical home owner's hose reel anyway... 3/4' hose is meant for commercial applications. One can increase pressure at the discharge by limiting exit diameter, by adjusting a nozzle, but that reduces volume... volume can't be increased past what is supplied from the source. There is only so much volume available from the typical residential water supply, that's why sprinker systems are installed with several zones... without separate zones if all the heads were run at once they'd dribble n' drip like your widdle impotent peepee. It's plain silliness installing a grid of piping over a six acre property and then supply it from a residential well, one would still need to walk about opening one valve at a time and stand there like a putz watering for however long before moving on to the next area. MUCH easier hauling water to the various plants... leave a bucket with a hole in it by each plant, and just refill from your hauled buckets as needed, less than 30 seconds per plant. Many large commercial nurserys use this system, wastes far, FAR less water... many sink a few 3' lenghts of 4" perforated poly pipe into the ground around each newly planted sapling, then periodically pass by hauling a water tank with watering wand in hand, don't even need to get down from the tractor to fill the irrigators.
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On Jul 2, 7:28 am, Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:

Try telling all that to any plumber or irrigation specialisst. Prepare for them to laugh in your face.
Harry K
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On 7/2/2011 9:28 AM, Brooklyn1 wrote:

Have you ever heard of frictional losses?
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Steve Barker
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On Jul 1, 12:58 pm, Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:

I hook up 50 ft of 5/8" garden hose to the sill cock at my house and measure the water that flows out over 1 minute. I do the same thing with 500 ft of the same hose. According to what you're claiming when I measure it over 1 minute, the same amount of water will flow. You have much experience here on planet Earth?
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On Sat, 2 Jul 2011 00:09:53 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net"

You've never done that, you don't have anymore 5/8" hose than your one 50' length or you could actually try it... I have many 100' lengths of 5/8" hose and have actually done what you suggest... whatever volume goes in one end comes out the other end... or do you mean when your mommy pinches your widdle peepee while changing your nappy.
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On Jul 2, 10:50 am, Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:

Of course whatever volume goes in one end comes out the other. That has nothing to do with what you claimed, which is that the volume of water flowing through a pipe depends ONLY ON THE DIAMETER. The volume of water flowing through a pipe depends on the diameter, length, and pressure. The narrower the pipe the more resistance to flow if has. The longer the pipe the more resistance to flow it has. That's how the laws of physics apply here on planet Earth. So if you connect 50 ft of garden hose to your home which has a water pressure of 50lbs you're going to get MORE water coming out the other end than if you connect 250 ft of hose. And if you connect a long enough length of hose you will get zero flow because 50 lbs isn't enough pressure to overcome the total resistance. Capiche?
And for someone so obviously ignorant, I would not be taking cheap shots at others here.
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LOL.
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On 6/29/11 6:30 PM, James Nipper wrote:

I wonder if you could find some used hand move sprinkler line. The stuff I'm thinking of is 4" aluminum and has a coupler for a sprinkler at each joint. It usually came in 30' or 40' sections. You could just pull it apart to drain it or put a valve at a joint now and then. One drawback might be its temptation to thieves.
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Good Lord. That stuff would now have antique value wouldn't it Dean?
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On 6/29/11 11:21 PM, FarmI wrote:

I've never heard of anyone collecting it. Old tractors and farm equipment , old cars and barb wire, yes. A former co worker told me people collect the insulators used on the old overhead phone lines. The scrap value of used aluminum pipe might be pretty high. Many farmers in my area went to pivot irrigation so scrapped their irrigation pipe. No one much cared for hand move sprinkler line. It was just too labor intensive. My Dad had some. He also had "volunteers" to help move it.
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Nah, neither have I, but farmers tend to get attached to stuff that's been sitting in their PUS pile for years and the value increases in leaps and bounds when someone else might want it.
Old tractors and

:-)) I have a few of those. I also have a few old rabbit traps that I've foudn round the paddocks over time.

You didn't step back fast enough did you ;-))
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Used all the time in farm irrigation. Also in the recycling business - very popular with the midnight recyclers.
Harry K
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Used all the time in farm irrigation. Also in the recycling business - very popular with the midnight recyclers. __________________________________ So what do they do with it? I presume they have a market, but is it for the pipes or for the aluminium.
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It's sold for scrap. High value, low weight.
Harry K
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I don't know what country you're in but I use polypipe to take water all over the place and since a lot of it has now been in place for up to 20 years, I don't consider it to be temporary.
I use 2 inch, 1 inch and three quarter inch. Very little of this is laid underground except for perhaps 20 ft of the 2 inch stuff that forms a main artery. Some of the 1 inch and three quarters of an inch stuff has become covered over the eyars as drebris drops on top of it. I have a main 2 inch line coming from our big tank (cistern in USian) and then I run one inch and 3/4 inch withint the veg garden and in the orchard and down to the chook pen and also from another 2 inch pipe down at the pond at the bottom of the garden.
Lay it out on a hot summers day when the sun helps it to lie out better and carry some hot water to do all the connections and it's an easy job. One hint would be that if you manage to find little sprinkler heads that you like, buy a truck load. I am reduced to 2 heads of my favourites.
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Agree with the above. For what he wants to do, 1" poly pipe should work. It's readily available at HD, Lowes, plumbing supply, online, etc. and reasonably priced.
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