Roundup or Weed B gone or...?

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On Fri, 27 Apr 2007 19:05:31 -0400, John Bachman

Why are you being so extreme here? Personally I don't care what you use. I am not an organic Islamist *which is very offensive to all the Islamists who are tender, loving people.*
I am organic, you may have called me an extremist a few years ago. I cleaved to the organic model. I still so, but for much different reasons. The way I garden is the only way I want to garden. I've given up trying to convince others.
Take it down a notch, or are those chemical applications starting to give you nerve damage?
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Well said Jangchub. I strive to be a civil gentleman and to me it would be a compliment to be called an Islamist, Muslim, Jew, Catholic, Christian or atheist. Or gardener.
With all respect to Jim's heart health, a little hard work won't kill ya! We're talking about may 8 hours of work to clear the weeds in the area which can be done over several days. A hundred dollars of chemicals or $100 of labor. You choose.
A chemical farm may be productive and efficient, not so for a chemical home garden or herb garden. Buying organic vegetables and fruits at the store and putting harmful herbicides and pesticides in the same shopping cart doesn't make much sense. Especially if you are already ailing from age and the frailties of the human body. Chemical risks for productivity is one thing, chemical risks for more leisure time, is another. Ironically, many of us use our leisure time to work out in the gym or take walks, play tennis, golf or basketball because our lives are otherwise too sedentary. If we practice polyculture techniques, as promoted by permaculture advocates, we can double or triple the productivity in our herb gardens or on the farm with no harsh chemicals.
This thought is explored more thoroughtly at weedtwister.com/ weed_twister_vs_roundup.htm.
----- At peace with weeds! (and people of all religions and philosophies) (and people who hate hard work - it's your life to live as you wish)
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wrote:

For some people, it is a matter of religious practice. I learned, on last trip to Israel, that people who keep very Kosher will buy only bagged greens that have a certification. Meaning that they have been washed so thoroughly that no living critters are left on the greens.
Persephone
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"Persephone" wrote in message expounded:

No amount of washing will remove e-coli.
--
Travis in Shoreline Washington


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On Sat, 28 Apr 2007 08:05:35 GMT, "Travis M."

Maybe I have it wrong. You raise an interesting point. Inquiring minds...I will inquire what else is involved in the "kosher" certification for bagged greens, and will post.
Persephone
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On Sat, 28 Apr 2007 19:30:55 -0700, Persephone wrote:

OK, I'm informed that the kosher certification involves power washing and some visual inspection. Kashrut has nothing to do with microscopic critters like e-coli, so two issues have been confabulated.
Persephone
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Pesticides http://home.ccil.org/~treeman/spring.html
--
Sincerely,
John A. Keslick, Jr.
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