roots and drain pipes in yard

I'm replacing the solid HDPE drain pipes in my back yard because they are full of ficus roots, and I have several questions: 1) The root invasion was apparently invited by leakage at the pipe joints. The pipes were just shoved into the couplings, which I guess is typical with HDPE. Is there any way to keep the roots out in the future, maybe some way to seal the joints or otherwise leak-proof them? 2) I've seen perforated pipes for lawn drainage. Why would you want to use these instead of solid pipe of the same material? 3) I have one existing pipe that is not infiltrated and drains to the street via a hole in the side of the curb. I want to tap a new drain pipe into this one (running perpendicular to it), but since the pipe is already fixed in place I can't just cut out a section of it and attach a tee there. The only thing I can think of is to cut a hole in the existing pipe and somehow connect the end of the new one to the hole. Any ideas about fittings or materials to make this connection?
Thanks for any help on any of these questions.
BF
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g'day bf,
first i would recommned get rid of the ficus they not only invade drain pipes but can get into the foundations of homes and cause damage.
the best method i know of keeping roots out of drain pipes is to use those poly type pipes that get glued together, they are more flexible to ahndel some movement of the soil and unless they actually crack roots can't get in, so long as the joints are glued properly.
that perforated pipe for yard drainage is a purpose made pipe, and is sued for draining poorly drained areas of yard so needs to be perforated, if you ahve a look at our frenchdrain/agricultural drain page you will get an idea of how it should be used.
but ther again if ther are any trees around with invasive root systems and fucus are at the top of the list these trees will clog up the drain in no time at all.
you can join into an existing drain pipe runs, but you do need to cut a section out and fit in a 'T' or a 'Y' junction and this too needs to then be sealed properly or you are inviting trouble from tree roots & leakages later if the ground moves.
no matter what you do be sure to lay/re-lay the new work into bedding sand to minimise possible damage from soil movements.
we ahve pl;umbing stores ove here or builders wharehouses they will sell you or should do exactly everything you want and they should also give some advice.
keep us informed
On 29 Apr 2007 01:53:00 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@volcanomail.com wrote:
snipped With peace and brightest of blessings,
len & bev
-- "Be Content With What You Have And May You Find Serenity and Tranquillity In A World That You May Not Understand."
http://www.lensgarden.com.au /
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|but ther again if ther are any trees around with invasive root systems |and fucus are at the top of the list these trees will clog up the |drain in no time at all.
Haha! I think you meant ficus?
But seriously: Are we talking about edible fig trees? I had the impression that they had fairly restricted root systems. Alexander
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On Apr 29, 5:40 pm, snipped-for-privacy@home.com wrote:

No, these aren't fig trees. I think there are a lot of kinds of ficus, but the ones I have are notorious for aggressive, invasive roots. I just pulled up a 40-foot run of 3" drain pipe that was literally packed full of roots. I hear they are related to banyan trees, and if you saw their surface roots you would understand why. They spread out all over the yard, and you just have to cut them back every couple of years. Doing so doesn't seem to harm the tree -- in fact, they say you would be hard pressed to get rid of a ficus no matter how much you hacked its roots. You just have to make sure to leave enough stabilizer roots to keep it from blowing over in a storm. In case you're wondering why I don't just get rid of them, my wife has vetoed that idea, plus it takes so long to grow a good shade tree to maturity.
Aside from replacing my drain pipes and replanting my lawn after removing the surface roots, my problem is finding a way to minimize or delay the recurrence of the root problem. That's why I inquired about leak-proofing my drainage system, because the roots are drawn in where the water leaks out at the joints. I also want to curtail the surface roots. Studies of root barrier systems have shown that ficus roots go under the barrier, but come back up to the surface a few feet beyond them. One thing I was considering, after seeing how they thrive in drain pipes, is to bury some deep pipes leading outward from near the base of the tree, with a vertical "shaft" that will allow surface water to enter the pipe. I'm hoping this would provide a root zone for the tree below the surface and encourage growth of roots there that can feed the tree and allow me to ruthlessy hack away anything I see growing on the surface.
BF
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g'day bf,
sorry about the typo, but the 'u' key is beside the 'i' key hey chuckle?
anyway as for the edible figs as far as know they too have intrusive root system not as bad as some other ficus but bad enough, over here in aus' the only ficus that don't are the native species, and not many people grow them.
and yes root barries would fail with ficus as their roots are very invasive, and cutting them back will probably cause even more roots to grow.
you should strongly conider the removal of the tree, and generally the tree should be poisened first and be well dead before removing it, you are haing problems with your drains it will also be causing maybe not yet seen issues with your foundations. once their roots get into a crack anywher they just get bigger and bigger in amoutn of root that enters and the main root gets larger and alrger in thickness until it eventually cause a structure crack. they rip up driveways, pathways and road surfaces.
your drains don't need to leak to attract their roots all they need is the tiniest crack enough to get a hair root into and if it finds moisture it will populate the drain rapidly, these sort of trees should never be gron in suburban gardens as the minimum distance from foundations and pipes should be at least 30 meters (100' app') and with some of the very large species double and treble that distance.
you only hope of making your drains pipe sytem ficus root or any root safe is to use poly type pipes that are glued together as i indicated in my last post. the roots you are aware of on the surface are nothing compared to deeper roots you can't see. and removing or cutting the few root s you find will never cause the tree any harm.
surely there must be a more user friendly tree to grow for shade?? the longer you leave those trees in the worse and the more the damage you will get.
and putting other pipes in like you indicated will do nothing more than provide more opportunity, and the tree and roots won't stop there. ripping up some lawn to repalce pipes is the easiest part of the job you ahve to do so far, foundations is a whole 'nother thing.
anyhow so far i think you ahve made a rod for your own back by planting these trees, and you hacking away at a few surface roots is not affecting the tree(s), these trees ahve an insatiable quest for moisture and nutrient.
might be time to bite the bullet so to say.
On 29 Apr 2007 23:18:08 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@volcanomail.com wrote:
snipped With peace and brightest of blessings,
len & bev
-- "Be Content With What You Have And May You Find Serenity and Tranquillity In A World That You May Not Understand."
http://www.lensgarden.com.au /
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Len & Bev,
Thanks for all the info. I can assure you I'm not the one that planted the trees, they were just there when I moved in. Knowing what I know now, I wouldn't plant one in the same zip code.
Thanks, BF
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