Rooting Azaleas - Now What?

I've been rooting a few azaleas for the past couple of months. All seem fine. The leaves are now turning red/orange/yellow. I planned on overwintering them indoors. What should I do with them now that this is happening? What type of environment should I keep them in over the winter (I'm in NY State).
Thanks,
Charles
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Charles Woolever wrote:

What kind of Azaleas?
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Travis in Shoreline (just North of Seattle) Washington
USDA Zone 8
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I think what Travis wants to know is whether they are deciduous or evergreen. There is a big difference in how they root and how they are treated. Evergreen azaleas root more easily and are transplanted more easily. Deciduous azaleas are more difficult to root and must be kept under lights the first year to prevent dormancy which is hard to break on young plants.
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These are deciduous. I've tried for 2 years to root some from my grandparent's shrub and this year I got 4 to root. Now they are turning red and I'm not sure what to do with them. They have been near a south window rooting for 2.5 months.
Charles

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Charles Woolever wrote:

Plant them outside where they belong.
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Travis in Shoreline (just North of Seattle) Washington
USDA Zone 8
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They need to be hardened off first or they will dye.
"In late August, transplant cuttings that are rooted and grow on in the greenhouse with supplementary light (14-hours a day) to prevent dormancy and induce new growth. In the fall after new growth has matured, transfer to a cool, frost-free cool (35F to 41F) environment to induce dormancy. As new growth develops in the spring, transfer plants to a shaded environment."
[After "Rhododendrons and Azaleas" by J. Lounsbery, Horticultural Research Institute of Ontario, Canada]
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