Roll n Grow

I've seen this advertised on TV. Has anyone tried it yet? Did you have any success?
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What is it?
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I don't think they're worth it....BUT I have seen some of 'em that are cheap.... google "roll and grow flowers" and you['ll several hits. I don't have areas that I plant this way... I always have bulbs, perennials, etc. I've made these in the past at school and the kids loved it. By the way, I always buy the .10 seed packets (unless it's something special) or try and save seeds from heirloom flowers. HTH Nicole

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That would be very interesting for kids to do. Can you share on how you made these.
--
:) Lynn


"Nicole" < snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com> wrote in message
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sorry, forgot to include the rest of the info URL: http://www.hgtv.com/hgtv/gardening/article/0,1785,HGTV_3546_1370006,00.html Homemade Seed Tapes Way to Grow : Episode WTG-132
Looking for a kid-friendly project that offers an interesting diversion during the "blah" days of winter? Host Dan Pawlus has the perfect answer-homemade seed tapes. Dan discusses the supplies needed to create the tapes and demonstrates how they are made. Materials and instructions are listed below: Materials: newspaper cut into 1"x7" strips (no colored sections) 1/2 cup all purpose flour 1 cup water Popsicle stick toothpick plastic bag 1 Tbs. salt paper towels labels pen seeds (beets, carrots, leeks, lettuce, etc.) Steps: Working with an entirely black and white section of newspaper (no colors), cut enough 1"x7" strips to accommodate the number of seeds to be used. Create a paste by combining 1/2 cup flour and 1 cup water- the paste should have the consistency of gravy and be thick enough to coat the seeds. Lay the strips out on a table. Space the seeds along the strips, following the spacing requirements printed on each package. Then "paste" the seeds in place on the newspaper strips using the flour-and-water mixture. Allow the paste to dry thoroughly, then roll up the strips and place them in resealable plastic bags. To complete the storage process, wrap salt in paper towels and place inside each bag with the seeds. (This will maintain the dryness necessary to preserve the seeds.) Be sure to label each bag with the seed names. To plant the seed tapes, remove them from the plastic bags and lay each strip in the garden to form rows (or follow an existing pattern). Finally, cover the strips with fine soil and water them thoroughly. The newspaper will decompose once it becomes saturated in the ground.
http://www.mrs.umn.edu/pyg/tips/soil_planting/tip_1215.shtml Homemade Seed Tapes Many commercial seed companies manufacture seed tapes Easy to use, these tapes are simply a strip of paper, with seeds glued on it at the proper spacing for the particular variety. These tapes are well suited for small seeds that need to be thinned after germination, such as carrots, beets, and lettuce. Sound simple enough to make yourself? Here are the details: You will need some paper, flour, water, a small watercolor paintbrush, and seeds.
Cut plain paper, such as copy paper or newspaper, into long one-inch wide strips. If you can find it, the perforated ends of computer paper used in the older style tractor feed printers is ideal. It is already cut and has regularly spaced holes that serve as a gauge for spacing.
Make a glue by mixing the flour and water to the consistency of gravy. With the brush pick up a small dot of glue, then touch the brush to a seed, and place the seed with the adhering glue on the paper
Continue this process spacing the seeds according to the directions on the seed package.
After the tapes have air dried on a flat surface, roll or fold them up and store in a plastic sandwich type baggie. Be sure to date and label the baggie. When it is time to plant, just unroll, lay it on the soil surface, cover with a thin layer of soil, and water.
Prairie Yard and Garden is a production of the University of Minnesota, Morris Media Services department for exclusive broadcast on Pioneer Public Television (KWCM) 1987-2006
Hope these ideas help Nicole

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Excellent, Thank you Nicole.
--
:) Lynn


"Nicole" < snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com> wrote in message
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No problem. Enjoy

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