Rhubarb OK to eat in autumn?

Page 1 of 2  
Because my rhubarb plant had the nerve to try and shade the oregano, I've been cutting off its older, larger leaves all summer. I offered some to a neighbor yesterday, but she wondered if it was OK to use the stalks at this time of year (for baking). I had no idea. Anyone know?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I don't see why not. Still it was of those strange plants where the leaves are toxic. Sounds like nightshade plants in a way that we love.
Bill
note this may matter
" the amount of oxalic acid is much lower, especially when harvested before mid-June (in the northern hemisphere), but it is still enough to cause slightly rough teeth.[citation needed]"
From below .............
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rhubarb#Toxic_effects
Toxic effects
Rhubarb
Rhubarb flower. Rhubarb leaves contain poisonous substances. Rhubarb leaves contain oxalic acid, a corrosive and nephrotoxic acid that is present in many plants. The LD50 (median lethal dose) for pure oxalic acid is predicted to be about 375 mg/kg body weight,[citation needed] or about 25 g for a 65 kg (~140 lb) human. While the oxalic acid content of rhubarb leaves can vary, a typical value is about 0.5%,[5] so a rather unlikely five kilograms of the extremely sour leaves would have to be consumed to reach an LD50 dose of oxalic acid. However, the leaves are believed to also contain an additional, unidentified toxin.[6] In the petioles, the amount of oxalic acid is much lower, especially when harvested before mid-June (in the northern hemisphere), but it is still enough to cause slightly rough teeth.[citation needed] The roots and stems are rich in anthraquinones, such as emodin and rhein. These substances are cathartic and laxative, which explains the sporadic abuse of Rhubarb as a slimming agent. Anthraquinones are yellow or orange and may colour the urine.[citation needed]
--

S Jersey USA Zone 5 Shade

"The destiny of nations depends on how we feed ourselves."
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

i'll take them! :) if you keep rhubarb watered they keep producing. old stalks can be woody & icky, but if you've been whacking them back so the stalks aren't too old, they should be fine. lee
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 10/29/2007 10:52 AM, JoeSpareBedroom wrote:

Raw rhubarb is quite toxic. Cooked stalks are quite delicious.
--
David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

No kidding?
That response has absolutely nothing to do with the question I asked.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Who would eat it uncooked?

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Good solid stalks? I would. They are very efficacious.
--
FB - FFF

Billy

Get up, stand up, stand up for your rights.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I presume that you mean the stems not the leaves. I haven't heard this before, what poison is in it that is removed by cooking? Do you have any evidence of the toxicity of uncooked stems versus cooked?
This ref is fairly comprehensive but doesn't mention it.
http://www.rhubarbinfo.com/rhubarb-poison.html#TOC82
David
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

"Rhubarb leaves contain oxalic acid, a corrosive and nephrotoxic acid that is present in many plants. The LD50 (median lethal dose) for pure oxalic acid is predicted to be about 375 mg/kg body weight,[citation needed] or about 25 g for a 65 kg (~140 lb) human. While the oxalic acid content of rhubarb leaves can vary, a typical value is about 0.5%,[5] so a rather unlikely five kilograms of the extremely sour leaves would have to be consumed to reach an LD50 dose of oxalic acid."
Perhaps the unpleasant, but minor effects of the oxalic acid are enough to convince people that eating too much wouldn't be such a great idea. Sort of like the stink added to propane as a warning.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

(and who eats the leaves anyway?)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

my goats, if they get into the garden. they also will nibble on rhododendron. they're stupid! i have a very large rhododendron out by my pasture gate & the road. i never thought much about it because the livestock couldn't reach it from the pasture... there's a summer camp across the street from my place (on the pasture end of the property). one weekend the cityfolk cammpers decided they wanted to see my llamas closer, so they picked rhododendron leaves & fed one of the llamas over the gate. she died. i was pissed, but i couldn't 'prove' who did it. at any rate we built a new electric fenceline 4 feet in, with an electric spring coil gate so no one can get close enough to poison the livestock again. and rhubarb stalks are fine to eat as long as they aren't woody. they'll produce all summer if you keep them watered (slightly shaded helps too). i eat raw rhubarb all the time when i'm out in the garden in the spring (i need to run a dripline to my row so it produces past the end of June). i've been eating raw rhubarb for 50 years, not a lot at a time because it's sour, but it's not poisonous, only the leaves are. lee
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Oxalic acid is often added to bread to keep it from moulding.
--
FB - FFF

Billy

Get up, stand up, stand up for your rights.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
as kids we would take the sugar bowl out into the garden, pull rhubarb, twist off the leaf and eat the stems raw just dipped in the sugar. they arent toxic. quite sour, tho. Ingrid

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Sounds pretty tasty at the moment for some reason.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The leaves are toxic.. cooked or raw

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

She said "stems".
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
JoeSpareBedroom;757656]"C_L_R_D" snipped-for-privacy@nojunkhotmail.com wrote i
message
The leaves are toxic.. cooked or raw-
She said "stems".
we also used to grab rhubarb stems and chew away on them after dippin in sugar. it was such a treat to have as we all loved the sweet an sour taste of fresh young rhubarb :). i would sure cook some of your rhubarb up and sit down to a nice war bowl of it and toast so good mmmmm. cyaaaaaaa, sockiescat :)
-- sockiescat
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Stewed Rhubarb
We just added sugar and water and corn starch and strawberries. Till it looked and tasted right.
Bill
http://www.google.com/search?client=safari&rls=en-us&q=Stewed+Rhubarb&ieUTF-8&oe=UTF-8
--

S Jersey USA Zone 5 Shade

"The destiny of nations depends on how we feed ourselves."
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

We eat it often at any season and never take harm.
David
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
JoeSpareBedroom;757022 Wrote:

We eat at home all the time, all year round, shouldnt be a problem : if you get sick or unwell, dont blame me though hehe.
Ala
-- Alan Hamlyn
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.