Rhododendron

I was thinking to plant a rhododendron (or 2) close to some austrians pines. I have an elevated space that receive quite some sun in the afternoon, maybe 3 hours. Because the proximity (2 ft) from this pines and the soil is covered with the needles I thouhgt could be a good option (acidic soil). I think I should work the soil deep to be sure it is good enough for the rhododendrons. Do you think this could work? Any other option for such a location?
Thnks
--
Paulo



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It sounds like it's too close. Plant outside the drip line.
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Phisherman Wrote:

I agree with Phisherman. Too close. The trees will soak up th moisture, too much shade and you won't be able to work the soil fo planting with all those tree roots. Rhodos are shallow rooted anyway. You should find this helpful.
http://tinyurl.com/5zwwc
New
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"Paulo" snipped-for-privacy@sorry.com wrote:

You have several things going against you. Rhododendrons are shallow rooted and can't compete with roots from other plants. You would have to prepare the planting site by digging a shallow hole, chopping out any pine roots, and putting in a barrier to keep the pine roots out. Sounds like a lot of work. Then the rhododendron would be happy but might not bloom if they didn't get enough sunlight. Sunlight is what stimulates them to set flower buds. Some varieties tolerate more shade than others. Some require almost full sun to bloom. If you are in a cold climate, the rhododendrons like winter shade and wind breaks, but summer sun and moist well drained soil.
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While that's bound to be 80 or 90% true, on the other hand SOME rhododendrons would probably love to be right up close to large trees. At SinLur Stoneworks Garden are wild areas with cedars, douglas-firs, & hemlocks, many with huge wild coast rhododendrons which self-selected their preferred locations within four to ten feet of the trunks of very large trees, well inside driplines. They are always healthy enormous rhodies that love the needly soil & semi-shade & are unaffected by how dry the soil can be amidst tree roots. The only coast rhodies that are not in such self-selected locations on the property are the ones left behind where their sheltering trees were cut down, & some of those show signs of not liking it out in the full light without a big tree as their nearby pal.
I don't know what percentage of cultivars would share this wild rhody's preference, but surely some do, & if I were to make some guesses, I'd include such azaleas as 'Poukhahense Compacta' that blooms well in dryish shady spots but can be weak in sunny moist spots, or the short 'Purple Splendor' which blooms extravagantly in degrees of shade that'd keep most rhodies from blooming at all. A plausible list of possibilities might be developed from the Greer guide's back-pages chart showing preferred levels of sun to shade, cross-referencing which varieties want the most shade to which require the least moisture, & among that whittled list should be more than a few that would share the Coast Rhody's preference for being under large conifers.
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Thanks a lot for all the responses. The place where i was thinking to plant the rhododendron is elevated. 2' from the pine is and square 1' high and 2x2'. I should check the distance that this plot it from the pines, but i guess could be almost 3', I am sure I will have to work the soil deep enough but again, because is elevated fromthe "real" soil level, i can do this without touching the pine roots. Also I do not consider this spot to be shady, has a lot of light and afternoon sun. I will check also azaleas.
Thanks a lot!
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Paulo
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