REQ: Advice on courses for Landscape design ......

Greetings
I am interested in starting a career in landscape design. I would like to use a correspondence or on-line course and would be interested in hearing from any one who is working on or has completed such a course and would be willing to recommend it.
Please reply to this thread.
Thank you
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There are such things of course, but as a college trained professional landscape designer myself, I have a hard time featuring how such a remote process would be of much benefit. You will miss the opportunity of participating in invaluable design critiques with fellow students and your instructors, you will not have the experiential training of actually working with real design issues - designing and installing irrigation systems, lighting, running a bobcat and working with grades and drainage - and you will not have the chance to develop a local and comprehensive plant pallette.
If at all possible, I would recommend you take advantage of a more conventional approach and get your training through an accredited college or university - even community colleges and technical schools offer very thorough horticultural and design programs and they often have them available for evening study. You simply cannot get all the background and experience you need by long distance.
Just my opinion. pam - gardengal
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GardenGal
Thanks for the info.
The only thing holding me back from doing the college coursed is time. With 3 little ones I just don't have the time to attend classes. I thank you for input though. T&T Gardens
On Thu, 23 Oct 2003 14:06:00 GMT, "Pam - gardengal"

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I live in Texas -- where only three schools even have landscape architecture degree programs...and none of them are in major cities...or even close to the two major cities I've lived my post-bachelors degree life in.
Considering Texas is roughly the size of Afganistan, commuting seems to be right out.
Oh, yeah, and I have two kids, too.
I feel for you, sub sonic! And let me know if you do come across an accredited program somewhere. Shoot, just getting an irrigator's license at this point would be a good start...
John now in Houston, Texas

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Well, gosh golly darn, John - how bad do you want to pursue a course of study in horticulture/landscaping or even as an irrigation installer? A quick Google search turned up at least 18 colleges or community colleges in Texas offering degree programs in this field, including Houston Community College, which has gotta be somewhat close to you, being in the same city and all. (I know Texas is big, but come on - you can commute across town, right?)
You don't have to apply to a 4 year university for a degree in landscape architecture (and I doubt they will be of much help getting your irrigator's license, besides) to become a landscape designer/contractor or horticulturist and the two courses of study serve different purposes and address different needs anyway. The training is out there, if you want it or can be bothered to look for it, and a hands-on, in person, degreed program is going to get you much farther faster than anything available by correspondence or online.
pam - gardengal
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One could also investigate apprenticing at a nearby LA firm or Landscape Design firm.
Dave

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