Replanting Poinsettias in the garden ? (PNW)

I live in the PNW. Would it be possible to plant my Poinsettias in my yard after the Holiday season? If so, what type of exposure, soil, etc. should I look for?
TIA!
-L.
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-L. wrote:

It gets too cold here.
--
Travis in Shoreline (just North of Seattle) Washington
USDA Zone 8b
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Dang! My DH bought me six awsome HUGE ones. :(
-L.
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our winters. They don't even like being transported in the cold from store to car to home. And be sure to keep them away from cold drafts in the home as well.
They can make an attractive houseplant, though. Do a google search to get the details of how to care for your point after the holidays.
pam - gardengal PNW
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Poinsettias could be grown outdoors in protected spots in North Florida (Tallahassee) such as against a south facing house wall under eaves. Tallahassee has many more nights of frost than Seattle, I'm pretty sure - but the days are uniformly MUCH warmer - averaging in the mid-60's even in January. I suspect that the plant is adapted to brief frosts as long as the ground warms up quickly during the day. I think it is native to Mexico, but not to the truly tropical parts - more to the subtropics that have cooler nights in winter.

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I've seen poinsettias planted as far north as southern north carolina and live for years, but they just become a big green plant. They don't get the red leaves back you see at Christmas. They do something to them in hot houses to produce the red leaves.
The Thrift Meister.....www.thriftmeister.com where you can find gardening tips in the gardening section.
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thrift meister wrote:

Don't they need a period of total darkness to rebloom?
Janine
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nights) with NO artificial lights shining on them during the hours of darkness.
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We are actually in Portland. It doesn't get as cold here, and I have some protected spots in the yard where I could try them. It rains a lot here, though, so they may not do well. The exterior of our home is stucco which retains heat, so that may add some protection as well. I might try it and see what happens - beats just throwing them away! Thanks for the info, everyone. :)
-L.
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Sorry, but Portland does indeed get colder than Seattle, also hotter in summer. Go ahead and try them if you like, but greenhouse grown points will not survive a zone 8 winter. They will not tolerate temps less than 40F without total defoliation and extended periods in the low 40's or down to the 20's (as can happen in the PNW), combined with winter rains exceeds root hardiness as well.. If you have any doubts about this, ask a reputable nursery in your area that features points at this time of year - they don't even recommend you leave them in your car when you are Christmas shopping!
pam - gardengal
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