Removing 1.5 Acres of Bamboo in Towson, MD

Page 2 of 3  
On Feb 10, 2:34pm, Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:

Hello all. I've been in talks with the local government (whom I work for) about the legal necessities and ramifications of this job.
I've located the septic tank well within the bamboo. So looks like I'll be using a chainsaw around there.
I got an email from a local government forester who referred me to the Home Horticulture & Master Gardener Coordinator at University of MD, Carroll County Extension. He gave me two links, one of which I've seen already posted. The first one is by Frank Gouin (retired MD Agronomist, who was the Bamboo guru).
http://bayweekly.com/articles/bay-gardener-dr-frank-gouin/article/putting-curse-bamboo http://www.nps.gov/plants/alien/pubs/midatlantic/control-grassesandsedges.htm
I am leaning towards some means of chopping it down to ground level (brush hog/saws), disposing the bamboo however (chipper?), and then applying Roundup in the Fall, as described in the first link.
Also for the friends of nature here, even if we clear cut the whole bamboo, there's still three acres of old growth deciduous trees behind it to harbor plenty of animals and what not. One of the main reasons for wanting to clear the bamboo is to prevent it from taking over the giant trees back there. I think killing off an invasive forest for the benefit of an old one, is a good trade off. But that's not the point of this post.
Thank you all for all the tips thus far. I think this post will find its way into Google searches and benefit many more people than just me.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

They make great tomato stakes after they are cut down & dried.
The initial cutting is the least of your problem. You'll then need to 'cut the grass' twice a week until it stops trying to grow back...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bamboo is a grass. You can chop it down, but it will sprout back out. You either have to dig up the roots, also, or kill the plant with a herbicide. Check with the nearest forest service, as they have a potent enough tree killer that will do the job and only they are allowed to use that herbicide. I doubt you can do that big of job, yourself.
There is a highly potent tree killer, pretty expensive, for consumers. I don't know the name, right off, but I can find out by tomorrow, probably. You spray it about 18" above the ground and it kills the plant. You might have trouble spraying the bamboo in the interior of that big of patch, if it's so dense you can't navigate within.
Once a herbcide is used and the plants die, you will still have the task of removing the dead bamboo.
The roots are as deep as 1'. You'll have lots of digging to remove all those roots, if you try to remove everything manually, while it's still alive. If a herbicide is used to kill the above ground plant, the roots can remain. They'll eventually decay. Tilling the dead roots will speed their decaying.
Sonny
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/6/12 5:24 PM, Sonny wrote [in part]:

Yes, bamboo is a giant grass. However, you do not want to use a tree-killing herbicide.
There are herbicides that specifically target grass, killing both the visible growth and also the roots but generally not damaging non-grass plants. I use Grass Getter, but there are others. These are best used when the grass is actively growing.
I suggest you have the area cleared. Any piece of bamboo remaining -- if it includes an internode (joint) -- can root and sprout. Thus, what is cut must be hauled away
In the spring, fertilize the area well and make sure the soil remains moist. When new bamboo shoots are about 1-2 ft high, spray with a grass-killing herbicide mixed with some liquid soap. The soap ensures that the spray really wets the bamboo. You might have to repeat this treatment a few times. Be sure to treat any new shoots that grow beyond the current patch; running bamboo can send its underground runners many feet away from existing shoots.
--
David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean, see
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Thank you David, and everyone else for the responses thus far. The county would not be opposed to this, but would ask for grading permits if we were to do any serious excavation. Just cutting it all down wouldn't require any notice of the gov't. One of the neighbors informed us that the old homeowner used to sell/give the bamboo to the National Zoo for its Panda. No joke!
100,000 lbs is a lot of bamboo! I don't think that's far off though. It is very dense, hard to walk through even, and the heights range from 10 to 30 feet in spots. I'll get some pictures, its quite a sight to see.
Theres a new problem of some possible underground utilities and maybe a septic field amidst the bamboo. This could explain the rapid growth. We'll have to use caution with mowers and tractors until we know where that is.
Thanks again for all the responses thus far.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I cane "beat" my wife & her grandmother with a chunk of it. You should see granny try to wheel away from me when I get the big stick out. She gets it twice as hard when she tries to make a break for it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

check this out
http://www.ci.austin.tx.us/growgreen/downloads/bamboo_running.pdf
http://www.ag.auburn.edu/hort/landscape/bamboo.html
Depending on the species, your bamboo forest could yield 50,000 to 100,000 pounds of dry timber per acre.
From second link.......
ERADICATING BAMBOO. Bamboo can be eradicated by several methods:
1. Graze it with cattle during the summer. If the plants are so large that cattle cannot bend them over to graze the leaves, they should be cut and the cattle allowed to graze the new plants as they emerge.
2. Cut the old plants in winter or early spring and the new shoots as they emerge in the spring and summer. This will require cutting several times.
3. Spray the area with a herbicide. Of the several tested at Auburn, Sodium TCA (sodium salt of trichloroaecetic acid) gave best success. This should be sprayed on the soil over the areas in which the bamboo is growing at a rate of 50 pounds active ingredient in at least 100 gallons of water per acre. It is preferable to apply it in late winter or early spring before new growth starts. Rain will carry the chemical down to the root system and it will be absorbed. This will sterilize the soil for about 90 days, so nothing should be planted on the area until about June.
http://www.mobot.org/gardeninghelp/plantfinder/IPM.asp?code=223&group=71&level=s
You can also kill bamboo by flooding the area and keeping it flooded for a couple weeks. I killed a very small area of bamboo (~2' x 2') by flooding.
Sounds like you have a fair amount of work ahead. :(
cheers Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/6/2012 10:54 AM, Elliott P wrote:

I imagine you could interest a back scratcher manufacturer? ^_^
TDD
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 6 Feb 2012 08:54:09 -0800 (PST), Elliott P

Burning won't do much except make the bamboo grow back faster and stronger. With six acres to tend you really need a decent sized tractor anyway, something at least 40 HP. I already have the tractor and a 5' tiller, also a 7' brush hog that depending on the bamboo might knock it down. With the right equipment 1 1/2 acres is a relatively small area for clearing. Were it me I might rent a flail shredder. Then till, and rent a rake... with the tractor till deep and then rake out the roots. You can hire an excavating company or DIY. You don't indicate the type of bamboo; how thick/tall... photos would help... it may need a crew with chain saws or a flail shredder could do the job: http://www.woodsonline.com/flailShredders.aspx This time of year a nearby farmer might do the job at a reasonable price, I'd guestimate $2,000. But with bamboo there's no guarantee it won't grow back... then I'd think you'd have to resort to a defolient, probably several applications.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I received an addendum to the herbicide treatment. Garlon 4 (and RoundUp) can be mixed with water, also. Adding a little detergent to the mix would allow for the herbicide to better adhere to the slick bamboo stalk.
I wouldn't recommend using a bushhog or shredder to cut the bamboo. Any knot or joint, left behind, would likely sprout. Running bamboo/ yaupon is a prolifically invasive grass specie.
You will have one heck of a job removing all the above ground bamboo debris, no matter what you do to cut it. Do a little at a time. It'll eventually get done, unless you can afford to do or have the whole job done, at one time.
Sonny
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Prepare for a multi-season struggle: http://www.ces.ncsu.edu/chatham/ag/homehort/BambooControl.htm There's a vast network of underground rhizomes that can sprout the second you knock down the tops, and will keep on doing so as long as there is stored starch in them. It will take a very long time to exhaust them by purely physical control methods, so this is one of those cases where physical and chemical controls may be required.
Always a good practice with trying to control something this firmly established:get an expert id on the weed first. If, for example, you've actually got Japanese knotweed, sometimes called Japanese, American or Mexican bamboo, there's a good possibility that the control measures could be different. http://www.invasivespeciesinfo.gov/plants/knotweed.shtml http://www.nps.gov/plants/alien/fact/pdf/faja1.pdf
Kay
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 02/06/2012 10:54 AM, Elliott P wrote:

on Ebay and see how much it sells for then think of how much you can make. It's like money in the bank. People pay for something you don't want.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 07 Feb 2012 13:24:18 -0600, Mysterious Traveler

Maybe he'll sell it to you, all you gotta do is come and take it all.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Elliott P wrote:
...
i'd be calling around, there are likely some people who'd want it, it does have many uses.
flooring, fencing, roofing, matting, blinds, walls, construction, musical instruments, food, ...
cheaper to get it locally than to import it.
songbird
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I'll bet the Amish could build some neat stuff with it.
Greg
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I had a half acre lot down in Ga my parents bought for me as a gift. Some gift! I could mow it down and there were be 6 inch sprouts the next day. The lot was in town but my neighbor had goats on a little hobby farm out in the country. We fenced in my lot and put the goats on it. It took all summer and fall but the goats finally won out. A new job took me out of state so I let my neighbor grow a garden on the lot until I could sell it. Think it would take too many goats for yours.
Jimmie
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Elliott P" wrote in message
Greetings all. A new property of my family's is covered by a massive stand of running bamboo. The lot is six acres rectangular, where about *one and a half* acres of the total acreage is covered by a very dense stand of running bamboo. It is 350 feet long deep at its longest dimension The plants have been there for decades, as the property was allowed to fall into a state of disrepair. It is our intention to restore the property, inside and out.
Options for removal I've seen generally target small areas. However this is a much bigger problem! My first thought is to hire someone with a bulldozer to come push it all down, and then put it all in a commercial wood chipper. This could get expensive though. What else can we do? What problems does my scenario present? Hiring a panda bear would probably not go over well with the neighborhood.
The property is in Towson, Maryland.
Thank you in advance.
If you're in MD, your 'bamboo' is most likely Japanese Knotweed. It's REAL tough to get rid of!
JAS
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 2/8/12 1:18 PM, John Simpson wrote:

Both Wikipedia and Sunset's "Western Garden Book" indicate that Japanese knotweed is Persicaria capitata. This is a ground cover that, in my garden, forms a mat about 6 inches thick. Through most (sometimes all) of the year, it has small clusters of pink flowers that resemble the flowers of white clover. For that reason, P. capitata is also called pink clover although it is definitely not a clover at all.
However, Wikipedia also indicates that Japanese knotweed is also Fallopia japonica (aka, Polygonum cuspidatum or Reynoutria japonica). This indeed grows like a bamboo to 10 or more feet high. If this is really what Elliott P has, a grass-specific herbicide will not work because Fallopia japonica is not at all a grass.
All this illustrates the fact that many different, unlike plants often share the same common name. This is why I try to use botanical names when possible. This also illustrates why the plant should be positively identified before any attempt to eradicate it. If a neighbor was correct in reporting that this was cut for feeding pandas at a nearby zoo, however, this must be a bamboo and not F. japonica.
--
David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean, see
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

David and others,
I uploaded several pictures I happen to have of the questionable plants to my Dropbox account. You can see the gallery here: http://www.dropbox.com/gallery/2745459/1/TowsonBamboo?h=d5ab39
I took these before posting this, therefore I don't have any close ups of the leaves really. The first shows a fox I found running in there. The next four are various angles, where you can see how massive these are. There are also some in the snow, and then one showing how a large tree has fallen among the bamboo causing some damage.
I'll take more when time and daylight allows.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

ahh you admit a fox in the area. thus you have a wildlife preserve. and will require federal state local government approval. must catch and relocate all the wildlife. and meet EPA and other requirements. plus post bonds and get inspections to prove the standards were met
why not just leave this island of whatever alone?
what ae you planning on doing with it? planting grass?
thats just more grass to cut:(
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.