Recommended groundcovers

What attractive, flowering groundcovers that grow no taller than 6" (under 3" would be best) would you recommend that will grow well under these conditions:
I live in Riverside, California (about 60 miles east of Los Angeles). I'm in USDA Zone 8b or Sunset Zone 19.
The summer high-temperatures may get up to 115 degrees The winter low-temperatures may get down to 15 degrees.
One-third of my garden is partly-shaded by a deciduous tree from March through December but the rest of my garden is in full-sun.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Look into brass buttons
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
gary wrote:

put lamium, vinca minor and ajuga on the list of possibilities
Carl
--
to reply, change ( .not) to ( .net)

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Make sure you like ajuga.
We can't get rid of it.
Bill
--

S Jersey USA Zone 5 Shade
http://www.ocutech.com/ High tech Vison aid
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
gary wrote:

Cinquefoil (Potentilla neumanniana): This grows quite close to the ground. It has yellow flowers about the diameter of a nickle, on and off from spring until frost.
Pink clover (Persicaria capitata): This is NOT really a clover. Its flowers resemble white clover, but they're pink. This also blooms from spring until frost (and even into frost if it's light). It creates a mat about about 4 inches thick. In the winter, the foliage turns red.
I have both of these together in the same beds in back. In front, I'm using pink clover in place of grass for the main part of the front lawn. I've tried the cinquefoil in the parkway in front, but it doesn't seem to thrive. In back, it grows like a weed.
Look up both in Sunset's "Western Garden Book".
--
David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
gary wrote:

You could always fall back on that old CALTRANS standby of Carpobrotus edulis or Ice Plant. It grew very well along the freeway ramps all the way up to at least San Jose. Grows _too_ well in fact since it seems to have become an invasive species but if you could manage to keep yours under control it was always a fine ground cover especially where water shortage was a concern. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ice_plant
--
John McGaw
[Knoxville, TN, USA]
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
John McGaw wrote:

Ah. I thought it was crapobotus.
It grew very well along the freeway ramps all the

It got way N. of San Jose. It was a problem to remove it at Crissy Field [SF] during its restoration ca. 10 years ago.
You may deduce I loathe it.
--
john mcwilliams

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.