Re: Viburnum dieback

I don't know the answer to your problem, but zone 8 to 10 can have amazingly different Heat Zone requirements. I live in USDA Zone 8b, but the new Heat Zone, I'm in 9b, almost 10. Summers here are very, very sustaining hot and dry. South,central Texas. For example, today's average temperature should be just about 90, which is a cool down. Do the math!
I have Viburnum davidii and V. burkwoodii. They both seem to be slow, are in shade, and do put on growth, but down here, root development is much more important the first three years of a plant, than the upper growth. Mine have grown about 18 inches in two years, but next year they will take off, I'm sure.
I still don't know why you had that problem, but have you watered or is it in the path of a sprinkler system which is not watering properly?
V
opined:

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In answer to your question, this was the wettest summer on record, with twice to three times the average annual rainfall. Usually our climate has sufficient water throughout the year to sustain most established plants, except perhaps in August. When it's excessively dry, I water. This year, that was not necessary.
I suspect either it's Verticillium fungus or the roots just got waterlogged after this constantly wet year, but I'd appreciate hearing from anyone with experience diagnosing Verticillium problems.
M
On Mon, 22 Sep 2003 13:01:48 GMT, animaux

Mike Prager Beaufort, NC (on the coast in zone 8a) (Remove spam traps from email address to reply.)
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