Re: Plant Labels - from used aluminium cans

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wrote:

Dr. Barry Thomas is a consultant for Health Canada.
Here is the position of Health Canada regarding aluminum cookware: "Aluminum can also leach into food from cookware, utensils and wrappings, but studies to date have shown that the amount of aluminum leached from these sources is generally negligible."
I wonder if they ran that one by Dr. Barry.
http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/hecs-sesc/water/factsheets/aluminum_human_health.htm
Don
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Actually Dr. Thomas is retired, though still cited as senior researcher on sundry research projects involving toxicity of drinking water, & cited on the specific rat-modeled Australian Institute for Biomedical Research study as that research's "Chief Directorate." If you need an explanation for how you could be the head of a study not personally conducted, then it's not surprising you also don't understand the outcomes if you don't understand the process. The hands-on work was overseen by Dr. Judie Walton. There were a slew of other authors in the symposium papers eventually published with Dr. Thomas as first author (because he oversaw the editing & choices for the book & wrote the introduction) -- everyone pretty much agreed (as Dr Barry agrees) that aluminum dissolved in water ends up deposited in brain tissue. None address the specific issue of pots & pans, but they have definitely put to rest the delusion that aluminum appears spontaneously in the brain -- it enters the bloodstream from the intestins as a dietary contaminant.
Aluminum sulfate is ADDED to some metropolitan water systems in the treatment process & that has had Dr. Thomas's priority to stop, even though he also has said there is not yet any "proof" that the alumnum is the cause of senile dementia. When a scientist speaks of "unproven" he's not general implying the opposite IS proven. And Dr Thomas's specific statement regarding almuminum as the causal agent was "there is not conclusive evidence. But we fear that it may." All that is definite is if you eat or drink anything that has aluminum traces therein, it will find its way to your brain. The rest may be assumption, but then, even gravity is just a theory, but we seem to adhere to the earth fairly well without proving it.

I gave the specifics. 3.5 milligrams per day JUST from the cookware IF you don't cook anything acidic like tomato sauce or rubarb (then it'll be more) or if the water you're boiling is flouridated (then the amount of aluminum dissolved be still more). But under the best of conditions, a "mere" 3.5 milligrams per day, day in & day out, just from the cheapy-ass aluminum cookware you're so proud to own. Add another 10 milligrams (or more) from a buffered asprin if you're one of those dopes who take a pill a day, another 30 or 40 milligrams from an antacids, it's starting to look like a healthy dose. If you REALLY want to cite some physicians who don't think that's a problem you could do MUCH better than Dr Thomas, who has never said it's not a problem, only that the greater problem is the amount of aluminum in drinking water.
Though much is not "proven" in absolute scientific terms, the least likely thing to EVER be proven is that ANY of the sources of aluminum contaminants are perfectly healthy & play no role whatsoever & that 3.5 milligrams per day is of no earthly consequence. There for a while (up into the middle 1980s) even the idea of bodily absorption of aluminum from diet & water was "unmproven" & Science Diget in the late 70s ran a whole series of articles among which only about one in ten thought it at all likely. Now pretty much every scientists agrees it's true -- the arguments are now over which sources play the largest role, or whether it causes senility or is a natural byproduct of other causes of senility. The Lancet report on aluminum contaminants in infant diets lowering their average intelligence as they develop seems to ME damnably definitive that aluminum is causal, but scientists are rightly chary of claiming to have discovered absolutes.
-paghat the ratgirl
--
"Of what are you afraid, my child?" inquired the kindly teacher.
"Oh, sir! The flowers, they are wild," replied the timid creature.
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I've been a lurker, but I just can't resist my 2 cents - Aluminum is the most common element found in the earth's crust. Just about any water which is not otherwise purified (distilled or ion exchanged) is going to contain Aluminum. The increase in concentration through contact with cans and pots will *insignificant*.
Also note that Aluminum develops a patina of Aluminum Oxide (*) which is highly insoluable.
* aka corundum - same stuff as rubies and sapphire
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com (Seamus Ma' Cleriec) wrote in

If you care to change 'element' to 'metal' or 'most' to 'third most', I'll agree with you.

How much and in what chemical form?

How did you come to this conclusion? Are you also saying naturally occuring aluminum compounds and artifically leached aluminum have the same biological reactivity?

What happens when you apply acid or a catalytic agent that dissolves the patina?

I'll agree that the Al-O bonds in Al2O3 are quite strong even when developed as a patina, but considering it inexpertly, that seems analogous to saying graphite and diamonds have the same hardness.
Thanks for the 2 cents, but I think I'll need at least a dollar.
-- Salty
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[snip]

Reference please.
[snip]
Franz Heymann
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[snip]

Undoubtedly it is paranoid. But take courage, you might feel a great deal relieved if you were to study the contents of the url www.alzheimers.org.uk in detail. In brief, the line there is that there is NO known causal link between Aluminium and Alzheimers, and that it is looking ever more likely that Aluminium is of minor or no importance in the development of dementia.
[snip]
Franz Heymann
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From: http://www.alzheimers.org.uk/Facts_about_dementia/Risk_factors/info_alumini um.htm
disease but no causal relationship has yet been proved. As evidence for other causes continues to grow, a possible link with aluminium seems increasingly unlikely.
later ...

disease results from a combination of different risk factors rather than a single cause.
So they've said Alzheimer's results from a combination of risk factors after offering proof by probability that aluminum is not one of the causes.
Still later:

outlined above do not convincingly demonstrate a causal relationship between aluminium and Alzheimer's disease, and that no useful medical or public health recommendations can be made, at least at present.
"no useful medical or public health recommendations can be made" - not for and not against

this problem one way or another.
Woe to you if you've been chowing on aluminum and carry the hypothetical Aluminum-nut-job gene. The rest of you move along, nothing to see here.
- Salty Nut Job
P.S. cute elephants in the gift shop
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snipped-for-privacy@netscape.net (paghat) wrote in

I'd be more worried about the sodium aluminum phosphate they typically use in fake cheese. other possibly bad stuff for your brain: monosodium glutamate (MSG) and aspartme (Nutrasweet)
- Salty
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wrote:

yes i've seen old metal stamping sets (amateru) they are perhaps cheapo versoins of old manual typsetting lettering sets. look like the metal striking surface from typewriters. very time cionsuming to line teh blocks in a holder, though i've never tried.

:)
[bauxite in english]
which is all around

than from pol;yKeferiNacronates or KrapoOrganKeellerKryonitez?
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Nice smooth stones with the plant name painted on looks great. Something to do in the winter.
--
David Hill
Abacus nurseries
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permanent
erm
I hung mine from varnished copper wire. (avail from TV, but galvanic action hurts aluminium)
creating these is a very time consuming way to get very few and flimsy labels with sharp edges. I consider it an experiment from my youthful time-wasting youth. (redundancy)
(unless you're Ted kascymski[sp] in a remote cabin with hand tools): I recommend you buy and ration the long lasting durable labels. use plastic (PVC) labels for seed staring pencil marks can be rubbed off. surviving plants receive permanent labels after proving their survival and other value (pollen or seed source, etc)

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Make a map of the garden if you need to know what is planted where. I have hundreds of plants on an acre of gardens and no labels. I am fortunate that I can identify and remember the name of plants. Draw the trees and shrubs and a border of the garden and any perennials, then laminate it, and use a china marker to put in the annuals. End of the season, you can wipe it clean and plan next years planting.
Cheers,
Ned
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