Re: Ground Cover for Steep Bank

Your best bet might be to first lay down an erosion control blanket like Curlex, through which you can then plant your groundcover. The blanket will stabilize the soil until the roots can spread enough to do the job.
Dave

wall.
will be

growing
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Try liriope (but only if you don't plan to grow anything else there.)
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See https://www.amleo.com/item.cgi?cmd=view&Words 180
"Biodegradable excelsior blanket with netting, for temporary erosion control and as an aid in speedy revegetation of slopes and waterways. Clings to soil with "barbed" fibers that reduce soil loss and strengthen its foundation. Retains moisture and provides a protective blanket for germinating seeds. Contains NO weed seeds, created from aspen wood fibers, a renewable resource. Acts as a mulch, and adds valuable nutrients to the soil during breakdown. 80% six-inch long or longer fibers. Consistent thickness, conforms to soil surfaces. Natural green in color. No chemical additives... Extruded polypropylene netting on one side breaks down in sunlight (short 30-60 day life-cycle netting), Fibers are curled Great Lakes Aspen Excelsior, interlocking with barbed edges..."
Typically it's used overtop of grass seed, but you can also pin it down, cut 'X' slits in the material, and plant in your groundcovers through it, then mulch on top. Another type of blanket is 'jutte cloth' or 'jutte fiber'.
Typical 'workhorse' groundcovers for the conditions you describe include prostrate junipers, various grasses, creeping or groundcover thymes, ivy, ajuga, etc. I like to sometimes use a mass of color, such as multiple 'Blue Rug' junipers, interspersed with a differing color such as 'Daub's Frosted' for a nice effect...
Dave

will
decompose
to
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Dave,
If you are located in a rural area i'd stay away from junipers. Their natural oils are very volatile. I'd really look into your state "native" grasses/plant materials.
Just do a "google" search for " state native plant societies". Native grasses really root and knit the ground together to prevent erosion.
Alain...Palomar Mountain [where the 200" telescope is]
DavesVideo wrote:

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Polygonum affine makes a great ground cover and has flowers for a long part of the summer. First saw it used when I went to the Olympics in Rome 1960, banks outside the main athletics stadium was planted with it. looked great.
--
David Hill
Abacus nurseries
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