Re: does this plant have too much water or not enough?

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Here is the correct URL.
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Because it is being fed helicopters instead of water. The metal in the helicopter cant be absorbed by the plant effiiciently. Do a google search for "helicoptitis". That will explain it much better than I ever could.
Fito
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"............ Why is this plant dying? ..........."
Looks as if it has been hit by a touch of contact weedkiller.....
Otherwise it could have got very dry and the tips of those leaves caught the sun and scorched.......though Agapanthus being S.African is used to hot dry conditions.
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David Hill
Abacus nurseries
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",,,,,
http://home.comcast.net/~web987/Picture_020.jpg
Why is this plant dying? ......."
Either because its roots are several hundred feet from the soil............OR....... You've posted the wrong Picture.
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Abacus nurseries
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There's two things that it looks like to me:
One is blight. That means while it has enough water, it is infected with fungus. Plants have a sort of pressure system that "pumps" them full of water. The pressure system is held together by the cell walls. When the fungus interferes with this, it wilts and dyes.
I know this is an anti-chemical group, but I don't know of a non chemical alternative to try and save the plant if blight is the problem. I would cut off the wilted and dead leaves and stems, then apply Ortho Garden Disease Control (Chlorothalonil) to it. That might save it. Ortho Garden Disease Control used to be called Daconil. It's 2.25 teaspoons per gallon. Put that in a mister and mist the plant with it.
The other thing is that it could be over fertilized. When this happens, the salts from the fertilizers build up in the ends of the leaves, causing them to die and turn brown ("burning" them). If that's the case, stop fertilizing immediately, pull out any "plant spikes" or any fertilizer prills or granules on the surface, and thoroughly soak with water.
The other thing I'd suggest is go to your local home improvement store and pick up two or three bricks. Set the bricks down and put the container on top of the bricks, insuring that the drainage hole on the bottom is exposed and not covered by the brick. This will insure good drainage.

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wrote:

Uh....airplane plant?
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wrote:

Take a good look at the picture and there is the problem. It isn't dieing, in fact it looks great. The leaves are burned from the sun. If making shade there isn't possible, trim those leaves back a bit. I like to cut them at an angle.
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In article snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com says...

It looks like you're having problems with black helicopters too.
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