Re: Clematis -- When to plant?

Hi James,
I'd plant them in right away, and just make sure you coddle them with adequate moisture until they become well established. I planted a tiny (6") Grandiflora back in April and it's already about 4 feet.
Dave

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Plant them now. It takes a couple years for the roots to get well established. Don't expect a lot of growth next summer. Protect the roots with a compost mulch.
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Proper mulching would be even more important at this time of the year, right? Because clematis like cool roots, so a clematis planted in the summer would need very careful protection? I'm not trying to discourage anyone from planting now; just reminding about need for cool roots.
I want to second the comments that Clematis may get off to a rough start but then recover and be very beautiful the next year. I was *this* close to replacing one of mine this spring because I thought it was dead. Then I saw one little green shoot, and the next thing I knew, I had beautiful flowers. By next year, it should look just as lush as the one next to it that was completely healthy this year.
Patty
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JNJ wrote:

Well, it depends a bit on the size of the plants. If you get the Clematis in 4" pots, pot them up in gallon pots, get their roots going, and either plant them in fall or next spring (you can sink the pots for winter). If you get more established plants, by all means plant them now. Keep them well mulched and watered, and since they are heavy feeders, fertilize once (bonemeal, rose or tomato fertilizer).
For really good information on which particular types of clematis are recommended and a list of sources, see http://www.gardenbuddies.com/articles/march03/bill/bill.html
Suja
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I like Armandii b/c it is evergreen. You can find out more info at <http://www.clematis.org/home.html .
I am jealous as I am running out of places for vines.
Best wishes! Heidi
Suja wrote:

--------------030805040307000608010206 Content-Type: text/html; charset=us-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN"> <html> <head> <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html;charset=ISO-8859-1"> <title></title> </head> <body> I like Armandii b/c it is evergreen. &nbsp;You can find out more info at <a class="moz-txt-link-rfc2396E" href="http://www.clematis.org/home.html ">&lt;http://www.clematis.org/home.html&gt ;</a>.<br> <br> I am jealous as I am running out of places for vines. &nbsp;<br> <br> Best wishes!<br> Heidi<br> <br> Suja wrote:<br>
<pre wrap="">JNJ wrote: </pre> <blockquote type="cite"> <pre wrap="">What I'm wondering here -- do I have to wait for next spring to plant or can I get away with planting some this year? Any suggestions on varieties as well? </pre> </blockquote> <pre wrap=""><!----> Well, it depends a bit on the size of the plants. If you get the Clematis in 4" pots, pot them up in gallon pots, get their roots going, and either plant them in fall or next spring (you can sink the pots for winter). If you get more established plants, by all means plant them now. Keep them well mulched and watered, and since they are heavy feeders, fertilize once (bonemeal, rose or tomato fertilizer).
For really good information on which particular types of clematis are recommended and a list of sources, see <a class="moz-txt-link-freetext" href="http://www.gardenbuddies.com/articles/march03/bill/bill.html ">http://www.gardenbuddies.com/articles/march03/bill/bill.html </a>
Suja </pre> </blockquote> <br> </body> </html>
--------------030805040307000608010206--
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Do you have them climbing up your shrubs and trees? I have three that are growing on roses, and have 5 more waiting, 3 of which will go on butterfly bushes, 1 on a trellis and 1 on a rose. If my husband didn't have a problem with it, they would also be growing up every evergreen tree I have.
Suja
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First of all -- thanks for the responses and links!
Ok, so what I'm getting here then is that I should buy now, pot 'em up, then transplant in a few months -- right?
My initial plan was to buy in September (money's tight at the moment) and put them in the ground right away (with appropriate amendments & mulching for the winter). The new fencing won't be put up for several weeks either. Should I change my plans?
We're in Zone 6, SW Ohio -- any varieties in particular anyone would recommend? Any vendors in particular I should buy from?
James
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Agreed... Jackmanii has some pretty flowers. I have two plants that seemed to take about two summers to become established, but this year they blossomed for about two months.
Keep the roots cool, mine are planted in a bed of hosta's and a bed of daylillies, and the plant in sun or partial shade.
Jackmanii is popular, seems that a lot of local garden centers carry it, but you might wish to look at the other hybrids also.
They can grow pretty large. Longwood Gardens (Pa.) has several clemantis growing atop a large stone wall....very nice !!
On Fri, 18 Jul 2003 15:42:02 -0400, Chelsea Christenson

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