Raised beds, Cedar or untreated

I'm looking at wood for some raised beds.
Cedar 2x8's are 3x the cost untreated 2x8's. So, I'm wondering, how long might untreated lumber last when it's used in raised beds? In direct contact with the soil/elements. 2 years? 3 years? 10 years?
(I'm assuming ACQ, non arsenic treated lumber is still considered a no- no)?
thanks
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

<http://extension.oregonstate.edu/news/story.php?S_No 9&storyType=garde
raised garden beds to grow vegetables or fruits. A study conducted by University of Minnesota found that vegetable crops grown in CCA-framed garden beds can accumulate arsenic from treated wood, but based on U.S. Public Health Standards, these vegetables would be safe for human consumption. To be on the safe side, you can line garden beds made of CCA-treated wood with plastic sheeting on the base and sides of the bed to separate the wood from the soil. For more information, see: http://www.extension.umn.edu/yardandgarden/YGLNews/YGLN-June0101.html#as and http://www.toronto.ca/health/factsheet_ptw.htm
I think most Americans believe that U.S. Public Health Standards are more corporate friendly than people friendly. The plastic liner would be a real pain to have to repair or replace, but it seems do-able.
--
"Fascism should more properly be called corporatism because it is the
merger of state and corporate power." - Benito Mussolini.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
DirtBag wrote:

Leevalley.com sells a system that incorporates paving blocks, were I to build a raised bed today that's what I'd use.
http://www.leevalley.com/garden/page.aspx?c=2&pG455&cat=2,44664
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I like lee valley. Check out the Japanese carpenter knife
<http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=2&pQ165&cat=1,51222>
--
Bill Garden in shade zone 5 S Jersey USA
<http://www.globalissues.org/article/75/world-military-spending
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 20 Mar 2010 16:00:51 -0400, brooklyn1

Hmmm...great idea. Looks easy to DIY without their system. Thanks
Charlie
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

What about composite decking boards?
Enjoy Life... Dan
--
Garden in Zone 5 South East Michigan.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 22 Mar 2010 13:08:48 -0400, "Dan L."

I think they would be great for raised beds.
Charlie
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Just need to put the posts a little closer together bscause they bend easily.
--
"Fascism should more properly be called corporatism because it is the
merger of state and corporate power." - Benito Mussolini.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Looks way kewl, but must cost a bundle to ship those blocks!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Higgs Boson wrote:

You didn't read it carefully. The fasteners are what they sell. Early in the description they say something like "Lumber and paving blocks not included." You buy those locally.
gloria p
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Bim-batta-boom.
--
"Fascism should more properly be called corporatism because it is the
merger of state and corporate power." - Benito Mussolini.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
DirtBag;880826 Wrote: > I'm looking at wood for some raised beds.

> long

> 2005, from 2 by 10 untreated lumber and they are still in decent good > condition :).

--
sockiescat


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
DirtBag wrote:

It depends very much on the type of timber and to a lesser degree your soil and climate. Some like radiata pine would be lucky to last 2 years untreated unless you live in a desert. OTOH some timbers are used for fenceposts (or wharf pylons) and are expected to last 40 years. Around here such are varieties of eucalyptus which are probably not available where you are but there may be local timbers that will do the job. There is a grading system for timber properties which includes durability in contact with the soil, talk to your timber merchant about it.
David
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.