Raised bed over old driveway

My husband would like to install a raised bed about 8 by 10 over an existing asphalt driveway pad. We would like to grow tomatoes, cucumbers and peppers. Will it work? How deep will it have to be? Also, we need to move some asparagus. Will it live in a barrel? How about in the new raised bed? Thanks, Carolyn
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Carolyn LeCrone wrote:

You might as well remove the asphalt. The conditions the asphalt will be facing will mean it'll never be suitable as a driveway again. And, unless you poke holes in it, the raised bed over it will turn into a sopping-wet mud hole that'll kill anything you try to grow in it. I also wouldn't put food crops over asphalt, which is essentially sand and small aggregate held together with a petroleum product. It's not going to break down enough to provide suitable drainage for a few years (depending on how thick it is), but it will break down enough to make it no longer usable as a driveway within a year if it's a typical thickness for a residential driveway. And that's even if you can provide enough drainage out the sides.
Also, a driveway isn't going to be flat. It's going to drain one way or another. Will what you can drain out the sides be draining across the rest of the driveway, leaving behind a film of silt, or will the rest of the driveway be trying to wash under the sides of your bed, bringing in even more petroleum products?
If you were putting in a temporary bed of colorspots that would only be there for a few days, like for a weekend festival, you might get away with a bed built on an asphalt base. But I just don't see success for anything meant to be more permanent than a week or two, and certainly not for anything that's going to be used to grow edible crops.
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Warren H.

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Well, I pretty much have to disagree with everything Warren wrote below, since I have had a raised bed for vegetables over an old asphalt driveway for 4 years, growing radishes, lettuces, chard, sugar peas, tomatoes, collard greens, parsnips and chinese cabbage. My raised bed is about 12-14 inches high and about 5 by 10. I used old concrete/aggregate that was sawed up from an old patio into neat rectangles as the sides of the bed. One side of it is bounded by an old loose stone retaining wall. I filled the bed with various bags of potting soil, top soil, dirt from other parts of my garden, chicken manure, steer manure, etc. I add a bag or two of manure every year to the top of it. My driveway is at the top of a gentle slope. Drainage has never been any kind of an issue. (Well, the blocks that make up the sides are not tight together. Soil doesn't leak through in any quantity, but I suppose if I overwatered, the excess would come through the openings between the blocks). When I pull up plants at the end of the season, they have not put down roots into the asphalt. The average root depth for most of the vegetable crops is about 8-10 inches. A neighbor's maple tree hangs over the bed from the north side of it, so it rarely gets rained on. I have to use a sprinkler on it, but that is not unusual in my climate.

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presley wrote:

You may be comfortable eating vegetables grown over petroleum products, but that doesn't make it a good idea. You're also going to have an interesting surprise when you remove the bed, and examine the condition of the asphalt. After 4 years of being covered by soil, that asphalt will be in a very different condition than the surrounding driveway.
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It seems to me you're pretty much making an assumption that the petroleum components of the asphalt are going to migrate upwards through the soil of the raised bed - but you're not quite explaining how you expect this to happen. The components could leach, it is true - but then they would leach downward, not upward. (The situation MIGHT be different if the entire raised bed were built over an asphalt pad that was a sinkhole - ie, at the very lowest level of land around - in which case there might be frequent flooding of the raised bed, and the potential for petroleum to leach upward). My bed is at the top of a hill. If the roots are not contacting the asphalt therefore, they are not taking up petroleum byproducts from it. And the roots of my vegetable plants are not contacting the asphalt. It is pretty much a truism in any case, that most of the feeder roots for plants are in the top few inches of soil - not at the bottom of tap roots, if they even have them. Also, the asphalt underneath the bed is the very end of a driveway parking pad that was not used for many years, and will not be used in the future, so I'm not concerned as to its condition over time- IF it is deteriorating. However, I live in a dry, cool, low rainfall, low humidity climate, with low activity of microorganisms, so most things that are subject to deterioration over time, such as wood, take many many years to break down here, so I would be surprised if the asphalt exhibited much damage, even after 4 -5 years.

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