Railroad Ties For Edging; Sealing Of Cracks In ?

Hi,
Have purchased a few old railroad ties that I plan on using to define some garden area borders.
Being quite old, and previously used, they have several substantial cracks (checking the right term ?) in them.
Thought it would be a good idea to pour "something" in the cracks to help hold them together, and as a secondary consideration to keep moisture from getting inside them and causing more cracks or enlarging those already there.
So, what should I use to hopefully help hold them together ?
My first thought was epoxy, but I doubt that it is fluid enough to really get inside deeply.
Would Gorilla Glue bond surfaces with perhaps 1/16 - 1/8 inch gaps ?
Or,... ?
Thanks, Bob
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I would skip the glue in favor of drilling a hole and inserting a piece of re-bar to secure the parts. I do not think glue would hole up in the weather.
BetsyB

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railroad ties are typically soaked in creosote ext.vt.edu/departments/envirohort/articles/vegetables/contgrdn.html When using wood products, it is important to avoid those treated with creosote or pentachlorophenol (Penta). These treatments are toxic to plants and people.
From HGTV http://www.hgtv.com/hgtv/gl_plants_weeds/article/0,1785,HGTV_3617_1397094,00.html Can railroad ties treated with creosote leach into the soil and contaminate vegetables and fruit? Is CCA-treated wood safe to use? Is glyphosate a safe herbicide? Master gardener Paul James offers his opinion on these controversial garden issues: Railroad ties
Are railroad ties safe? At issue is creosote, a powerful preservative that's applied to railroad ties. Creosote is a thick, oily pungent-smelling liquid made from the distillation of wood or coal tar. It has been linked to a number of health problems--including skin and respiratory disorders. If you were to expose yourself for long periods of time to creosote--especially on a warm day when it's more volatile--there's a chance you could wind up needing medical attention.
"If you limit your exposure and wear protective clothing when working with railroad ties, I don't think there's any great cause for concern," says James. "I would, however, strongly suggest that you limit the use of railroad ties to things like retaining walls rather than raised beds--especially in vegetable gardens. Some chemicals in creosote can leach out of the railroad ties and into the surrounding soil--chemicals that have the potential of contaminating food crops."

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