Quick Q regarding rabbits

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wrote:

Hmmm,
Fito, I live in Minnesota.
Now, there are birds who live here throughout the year, including the deepest part of winter. One of those, for instance, is a thing called a pheasant. Another is the wild turkey. Yet another is a thing called the prairie chicken. All, like a chicken, are primarily ground dwellers.
Now, I do go outside in the winter here, quite regularly, and do get around. In fact this morning, as is my usual habit, I was up and about at 4 am and out taking a little jog by 4:15. Just enough to shake the kinks out and loosen up my somewhat aging joints, and get the blood flowing. At age 55 I'm finding that when I don't limber up, shake things out and loose, this aging bod feels like crap and has difficulty waking up and coming alive.
Anyway, nice morning. Calm, peaceful, a refreshing minus 8 degrees fahrenheit if I'm to believe my outdoor thermometer. Very peaceful jog, especially as I live in the country (rural).
Wanna know something? I know my area, in which I live. Know it well. Know where some local wild turkey live. And pheasant. Etc.
Strange as it may seem, evidently none of them seemed to think it was all that cold. I'm speculating of course.
But I sure didn't see any vapors rising from the furnaces of the wild turkeys or pheasant.
And I'm a right friendly neighbor, and they know that as I don't take pot shots at them or chase em or anything. And they could easily see exhaust vapors rising from the exhaust pipe of my furnace. So I'm presuming it's not a matter of them having run out of fuel oil or propane in their turkey and pheasant houses. Otherwise one might expect they'd come knocking on this neighbor's door, saying "Burrrrrr .... might we come in and warm up neighbor?"
<G>
I'm being tongue in cheek, of course.
You're comment is ridiculous, so I was responding in kind.
That fellow's chickens, if he's provided them wind breaks, adequate roof so that they can stay dry, acceptable bedding materials, and decent food. Are just fine. Provided he assures they have or can get liquid water. A wild bird has the option of searching for water. A caged one does not.
In fact his chickens probably are quite happy to feel relatively safe from fox, coyote, wolf, bobcat, or cougar, etc.
I take that back, as they've almost certainly never been wild, they've likely never had to learn to fear such wild and natural predators.
And as he provides them plentiful food, if he does, for a critter, they're probably fat, happy, and sassy. Figuring they have a pretty easy life. As compared to their cousins. Most of whom will die very early in their lives, never seeing maturity at all.
You should think before posting material which might cause others to wonder if yah know a damned thing about the animals you say you care so much about.
Bob
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I wont begin to make legitimate argument on a subject a know little about. Now that I look back at my response I did sound like someone from PETA. Either way, thanks for your response. It was enlightening. Do I still believe the chickens are better off unheated? Nah. Are they being hurt? I wouldnt think not. I guess my view arises from the picture of what -5 degree feels like. We dont too much of it here in NYC but when we do, Brrr!
Fito
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I provide them plenty of food. When it's warm, it is my leftovers, which I boil for them into a srt of a soup. When it's cold,m it is dry chicken feed.
I also have a heated pet bowl where I insert the waterer.
They live in a wind protecting shed.
i

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THEY ARE BIRDS FOR GOD'S SAKE!!!!! where do you think the little chickadees, cardinals, house sparrows, etc are finding heated trees????????? all they need is seed and open water (which for wild birds is a limiting factor) AND protection from predators and they are going to do fine in any kinda shed. Ingrid

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ List Manager: Puregold Goldfish List http://puregold.aquaria.net / www.drsolo.com Solve the problem, dont waste energy finding who's to blame ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Unfortunately, I receive no money, gifts, discounts or other compensation for all the damn work I do, nor for any of the endorsements or recommendations I make.
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if you put on a feather/down jacket, like chickens have, you could also survive -5f.
I have a 2.5 kid and we take him for 40min-1 hr walks in -5f.
i

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Rabbits can't live on grass clippings alone and should not be fed any that have been chemically treated with pesticides or fertilizers. Get a mulching lawn mower - you have to mow the lawn anyway and at least with a mulching mower you are returnig the clippings back to the lawn where they act as a natural fertilizer. Less waste, better for your lawn and no nutritionaly deprived bunnies to worry about.
Or you could get a goat.
pam - gardengal
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Will a goat survive on lawn clippings?
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I have it on the authority of several well known cartoon characters, that goats can survive on tin-cans.
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You would be wrong. Goats need quality feed like a hand full of Goat Oats daily in addition to the forage. They do eat everything, but that can kill them. I had one eat a plastic bread sack that blew into our yard. She went down and died of toxic shock the next day. (I did not see her eat it, but in the autopsy we found it.)
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Are you sure it was toxic shock and not asphyxiation?
Anyway, cartoon characters (even famous ones) have been known to be wrong before.
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snipped-for-privacy@notsogreenthumb.fake says...

that

Actually, that legend is based on the fact that goats used to love to eat the paper labels off junked tin cans because the paste tasted so good.
I don't think modern labels and glue have the same attraction...
FW
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On Mon, 19 Jan 2004 11:41:33 GMT, "Pam - gardengal"

Or sheep, if he'd like a nicely even lawn.
Bob
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On 19 Jan 2004 00:14:10 GMT, Ignoramus3274

"Survive" or thrive? *People* can survive on significantly inadequate diets, 'though not grass clippings. There are plenty of references and books on 'raising rabbits for fun and profit'. If "wasting time" on lawn chores is a concern, you should be aware that rabbits take a fair amount of labor to feed, house, and nurture.

Sad.
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I have kept rabbits in the past they need a varried diet grass clippings ar poor in nutriants and will not provide needed minerals and vitamins rabits need to have an asorrted diet usually the more colors of vegies the more vitamins orange is usually vitamin a , No light green or vegies containing too much water like Iceburg lettuce are good for rabbits they can give them the runs which will kill them. Dark greens are ok like spinach or red lettus rabbits can suffer from scurvy so thay need vitamin c they can benefit from a mineral block If your question is can they survive yeah for a while but not in good health and not very happily and would have shorter life span. That's why they crave to get into all our gardens adn eat up the world in them as my garden has suffered more than once.
People can survive on bread and water for the most part :- ) my self prefur abit more selection my self

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we got rabbits ... well my DH does. two sets. the school set (girls) and then the set he started with Bella and Luna and the girls were sooooo cute he couldnt leave them at school. velvety black dwarf bunnies Bella got buff markings under the chin, Luna has white. they are fed: rabbit pellets, yogurt pellets, alfalfa and have a mineral block. The DONT get carrots, lettuce, etc for the reasons you outlined. Ingrid

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Why do you think that it is sad? These chickens are supposed to do well in freezing cold weather. Think about it, each has a good down/feather jacket on her.
i
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Rabbits should not be fed a diet mainly of green matter, young rabbits will scour (get diarrhea) and die. Older rabbits can learn to tolerate more green feed in their diets, but they will still need other forms of food, pellets or dry hay for roughage and bulking materials to prevent the older rabbit from going the same way of the younger ones.
Were you planning on using the rabbits in place of mowing, or you were planning on mowing and then giving the rabbits the trimmings? You are aware that green grass piled up very deep rapidly heats up and if it's deep enough it will burn. Dad and I decided to unload the trailer that had lawn trimmings in it, after we ate dinner one day, and when we went out, smoke was starting to rise from the trailer, and the tines of the pitch fork were getting hot enough to burn my leg while I was unloading it, and when we got to it, the center of the load was a mass of black charcoaled grass. After that, I understood why haystacks would suddenly catch fire, it was baled too green, stacked too soon.
If you want something to mow the grass and do so quickly, make a chicken tractor, a long bottomless pen to drag along let the chickens eat the grass, pull it down further, and let them eat the grass... repeat. half dozen to a dozen would do a good job. Probably illegal, but get hens only and share some eggs if someone spots them. Yolks will be DEEP orange with all the greens! Chickens will eat that greenery though, they're just piranha with feathers!! ;-) I miss my chickens :(
On 21 Jan 2004 04:23:43 GMT, Ignoramus1390

a few chickens can't heat up a chicken coup much in winter but a dozen can! Of course the size of the pen can be reduced, and insulated well and then 3 could heat it fairly well I suppose. Infrared heat lamp works if it gets too cold.
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On Wed, 21 Jan 2004 00:34:59 -0700, Janice

He HE true about the chickens but being irish as I am I think sheep would really cure the grass mowing one or two would cure the problem of grass altogether HE HE :- ) Smile Michelle "Love is the water in the garden of life"

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Michelle wrote:

In my very limited experience with sheep, they eat what they like and leave the weeds for last. That encourages the weeds. Also, you have to move them around (divide your field into several sections and rotate through them) to keep the parasites down, so it's not as easy as "turn them out and let them eat". Some field management required.
I have heard that goats eat anything. (But they don't actually eat tin cans -- just chew on the labels). I have no experience at all with them. Anyone have comments?
The problem is not the grass, it's the obsession with mowing it (and watering it and fertilizing it and broadcasting weed killers and insecticides etc. etc.) <rant> If you don't use the lawn, why do you care how long the grass is? Long grass is still green (probably greener than short grass). If you do use the lawn, you probably don't want all the nasty stuff on it. </rant>
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On Wed, 21 Jan 2004 16:06:12 -0500, Dwight Sipler

THEY LIKE THE GLUE THAT'S WHY THEY CHEW ON THE LABELS Yummy :- )

Well you could do what I'm planning to do and that is make a maze out of my yard so you can't see straight across my yard from any point I plan to make a twisty path to a pond rose garden fruit trees statues of mary and such I'm catholic so got to have mary in my garden maybe a nice grato with benches along the path accros from nice views and a nice garden house that will keep all my tools but look like a little cottage It' s probably a pipe dream but I might be able to finish it before I'm ninety six I've only got seventy years to go he he I don't like a lot of gras but decorative grass in the right places or some to spread out on near my pond or gratto will be nice this is a fun group and informational tooo your're right about the goats though they will eat the gras to the nubs and you certaintly won't have to wory about grass he he Michelle "love is the water in the garden of life"
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