Question about an orange tree

Hello All,
I have a question regarding an orange plant that I have in my garden. It is planted in the ground (i.e., it is not in a pot). It is about three years old. The plant has not grown at all in these three years. There are very fe w leaves on it. Often the leaves turn yellowish, curl up and fall down. Dur ing summer (as in now), when other fruit plants in my garden grow and becom e full of leaves, it has barely few. It has now started to shed even leaves that are green.
I initially suspected some insects behind the problem. It could still be tr ue, but that may not be the only problem.
I wonder if anyone can identify any cure for this problem.
Thanks very much in advance.
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On 6/28/13 8:07 PM, snipped-for-privacy@juno.com wrote:

Oranges -- and all citrus -- require excellent drainage. In the ground, they should be irrigated only when the top 2 inches of soil are dry; then, give a generous soaking. Your description sounds like a citrus that has poor drainage and is getting irrigated too often.
Also, citrus needs an acidic soil with nutrients that include extra iron and extra zinc. Your soil might be alkaline or lacking in iron and zinc.
Finally, citrus has tender bark that is easily damaged by too much sunlight. If your tree is almost leafless, you need to wrap newspaper around the trunk and main branches.
--
David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean, see
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Thank you very much. I am also sharing some photos. The quality is not that great, hopefully it will still be useful for seeing/analyzing the problems further.
https://docs.google.com/file/d/0B5qzYa_9LoSLVXJWd2F4SUdRS2s/edit?usp=sharing https://docs.google.com/file/d/0B5qzYa_9LoSLeWIyT3RsT2hwZ3c/edit?usp=sharing https://docs.google.com/file/d/0B5qzYa_9LoSLNW0ySmlfb1JzNG8/edit?usp=sharing https://docs.google.com/file/d/0B5qzYa_9LoSLbXdNcXN0S3Jzbmc/edit?usp=sharing
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On Sat, 29 Jun 2013 21:49:27 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@juno.com wrote:

Not a good location shaded by that fence, and I suggest having that soil tested, even english ivy is struggling.
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On Saturday, June 29, 2013 9:49:27 PM UTC-7, snipped-for-privacy@juno.com wrote:

Mit - is this a full-size or a dwarf orange? They have differing needs.
I am the parent of a dwarf Washington orange that is (knock on wood) doing well. Finally, after 2 failed attempts. One was insufficient sun. The second, I don't know why.
Third time was the charm. When the first 12 or so oranges got ready to pick -- in So. Calif that's around January -- this secular being was so moved that I recited a blessing for first fruits.
Now there are 2 little babies just starting their long climb toward my bouche.
If yours is a dwarf, give it plenty of water -- not daily shallow, but approx weekly via long, slow flow. If you have rain, lucky you!
Fertilize according to plant's requirements; easily ascertained on-line. Don't just throw it on and work in; needs to be at appropriate time.
Keep us posted as to its progress.
HB
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On 6/30/13 3:01 PM, Higgs Boson wrote:

The second, I don't know why.

moved that I recited a blessing for first fruits.

time.

I also have dwarf citrus. See my <http://www.rossde.com/garden/dwarf_citrus.html .
--
David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean, see
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On Sunday, June 30, 2013 3:01:31 PM UTC-7, Higgs Boson wrote:

Additional note: When you water, don't put hose right at trunk. The small feeder roots, which are the ones that take in water and food, grow horizontally, so water should be applied at the edge of foliage.
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On 6/29/13 9:49 PM, snipped-for-privacy@juno.com wrote:

From the photos, it looks like a newly planted dwarf. The tree might merely be suffering from the stress of being planted.
If it is indeed newly planted, DO NOT FEED IT NOW. Let the roots get established before you try to promote top growth.
If this tree was planted last year, however, my prior comments apply.
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David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean, see
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