Pruning Cherry Trees

We live in the UK and have a couple of Cherry Trees in our garden which are rather large. With one of them it looks like originally the top part of the cherry tree was grafted onto a trunk from a different type of tree.
Is it OK to prune these trees at this time of year or should we wait until the spring. If I prune the tree now, and there is a frost next week, will it damage the tree in any way?
Thanks
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Vonsworld


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On 11/8/11 8:37 AM, Vonsworld wrote:

Unlike most other stone fruits, cherries bloom on short spurs on mature wood. The same spurs produce flowers for more than one year. Thus, cherry trees do not require serious pruning. Do corrective, aesthetic, and slight renewal pruning. Remove dead or crossing branches. Remove branches that interfere with the sidewalk and street. If a newer branch has proven productive, remove a nearby older branch (especially an older branch that does not lend appeal to the overall appearance of the tree).
If these are ornamental cherries (e.g., Japanese flowering cherries), prune them immediately after they bloom in the spring. You want to avoid removing any bloom wood before flowering. Pruning after flowering might promote the growth of new bloom wood for the following spring. Do not delay into the summer, or you will be pruning away next year's flowers.
If these are fruiting cherries, prune after the trees go dormant in the winter. If you can stand the cold, wait until the weather is truly wintery. Otherwise, prune them at the end of winter before they start to leaf out. If you prune them before the weather gets cold, you might promote new foliage that will be damaged or killed by winter frosts.
--
David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean, see
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Vonsworld;941369 Wrote: > We live in the UK and have a couple of Cherry Trees in our garden which > are rather large. With one of them it looks like originally the top part > of the cherry tree was grafted onto a trunk from a different type of > tree.

> until the spring. If I prune the tree now, and there is a frost next > week, will it damage the tree in any way?

Hi Vonsworld, further to other replies, let me add something important for you to consider. Here in the UK, most stone fruits are being seriously affected by a disease called 'silver leaf', where a fungus attacks the plant and causes the upper and lower leaf surfaces to separate giving a 'silvery' effect, hence the name of the disease. Now these fungal spores seem to mainly enter the tree in winter through the cuts, so if you prune as suggested in winter, make sure you use a bituminous based pruning compound but I would suggest that you leave any pruning to when the tree is in leaf when this disease is less active and to be safe, I'd still cover any cuts with pruning paint just in case.
regards, Lannerman.
--
lannerman


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Vonsworld;941369 Wrote: > We live in the UK and have a couple of Cherry Trees in our garden which > are rather large. With one of them it looks like originally the top part > of the cherry tree was grafted onto a trunk from a different type of > tree.

> until the spring. If I prune the tree now, and there is a frost next > week, will it damage the tree in any way?

Young cherry trees need pruning to develop the correct shape, and mature plants will produce a better crop if pruned to encourage fruiting wood. They require only light pruning once established.
--
allen73


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