Propane weed burner question

Page 2 of 2  


Went to the feed store in town today. Clerk recommended 20% acid vinegar. She warned it only lasts about 2 months. Then the weeds come back again.
Vinegar in grocery store is typically 5% acid. Dave
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
43.com (Jack S) says...

Salt. If you are in a dry climate, one application will sterilize the soil for years.
--
For email, replace firstnamelastinitial
with my first name and last initial.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Boiling water works suprisingly well.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Flaming is also used in organic farming to keep the annuals and biennials from growing and flowering. Eventually the roots will die from a lack of photosynthesis. If they are already flowering, you may wish to cut or pull out the plant and flowers to reduce weed seeds from spreading around. However, I doubt if any weed seeds may survive the toasting at 3000+ F?
----- At peace with weeds...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

John
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Is the OP in Seattle? If not, who cares?
I just burned my "lawn" and garden off. It's finally time to plant. And we're going to burn 20 acres of hay meadows off that we weren't able to hay last year, due to Seattle-type weather all frigging summer.
Jan in Alaska
--
Bedouin proverb: If you have no troubles, buy a goat.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

really spruced up the fields nicely, killing weed seeds and other pests "reconditioned" the soil for the new crop. It was a nice, organic time honored method.
But the environmentalists managed to outlaw field burning on air pollution grounds. So now the farmers use chemical methods to control weeds and other pests. This is a perfect example of the law of unintended consequences.
Did those opposing field burning really accomplish anything?
JHMO
John
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Alaska is being invaded by people who are opposed to everything, even if they don't know what the f*ck they're talking about.
We're supposed to call the fire hall in town (22 miles away) if we want to light our burn barrel now. Like that would do us a lot of good. I've never seen our local fire department lose a foundation yet.
By the time they get here, houses are a total loss and the guys show up and water-down the smoldering debris and foundation, make a big mess, destroy the yard and driveway, then strut around like they did something important.
It's getting so people with common sense are outlawed from doing what any man with a lick of sense would do.
Jan
--
Bedouin proverb: If you have no troubles, buy a goat.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yea, they call them cellar savers up in NH and Maine (where there isn't municipal water supplies in many areas).
--
Ann, gardening in Zone 6a
South of Boston, Massachusetts
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I'm a long way from both of you (N. Calif.) but it is the same deal here. When I moved here to Sonoma County, some 35 years ago, we would chuckle about how our smog would blow down to San Francisco leaving us to breath clean, fresh air. Fast forward and we can't get rid of it now. Saddening to look east, towards Santa Rosa, and see an orangyish, gray sky hanging over the valley whereas, if you look west, towards the redwoods, the sky may have some low clouds or fog but it is clean, to the naked eye.
Part of the reason I left So. California was that I couldn't breath the air any more. God, we had beautiful photochemical sunsets back in the 60's but the air would eat the tires right off your car. There were days I couldn't exercise because I couldn't take a deep breath. That and the fact that the housing tracts of Orange County couldn't compete with the rolling, oak covered hills of the Bay Area, made me pack my bags and move it on north.
Well, the population of Santa Rosa has increased about six fold since I arrived. The air quality, the salmon and trout and, the traffic have all gone to hell. Now I can feel the pressure of having to get one of those low emission, EPA approved wood pellet stoves. Children and, people in middle age, are getting asthma. People with heart problems are getting lee-tell, teeny-weeny particles in their lung, making it harder for them to breath. What to do? Damn-it, the smell of wood smoke is one of the few rewards we have in the fall. I love it.
I don't know the answer. I'm sure there are plenty of SOBs out there, like Monsanto, who are trying to spin this (and are willing to give campaign contributions to the right politician) in their direction. Best we can do, as far as I can see (Oh lord, not another learning curve.), is to find out what everybody needs and then try to accommodate each other.
We used to have burn days here in Sonoma County but I haven't heard them mentioned for years. I'm not a farmer so I haven't kept up with their (and rightly, our's too) problems. Burning the fields has always been a wise way to finish or start the agricultural year. (Can't just till them under for compost, huh?)
We need our farmers. We need to change "price supports" back to the "farmer supports" of the New Deal. If you ask Jan and John, I'm sure they'll tell you that there is good money to be made in food. Just not in the growing of it.
So I guess the only justification for this mind fart, that I appear to be having, is that we should all have a right not to have our work made more difficult than it already is and, we all should have a right to breath clean air. But as Lenny Bruce used to say,"What should be, isn't what is".
Good luck making any sense out of this.
- Bill Coloribus gustibus non disputatum (mostly)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

weed burner has nothing to do with burning fields.
You do not have to char the weed, just apply a bit of heat to it and get it to wilt a bit and that sucker is a goner.
I wet down the area before I use my burner - that prevents flare ups but I keep the hose handy just in case. Use a little common sense and there is no problem. I cannot imagine any justification for outlawing their use.
Sure, stupid people mis-using a weed burner can cause problems but you can say that about the use of many, many products including cars, chainsaws and lawnmowers. We should not penalize the conscientious user to protect the idiots from themselves.
JMHO
John
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You can use your weedburner the way you want and I'll use mine the way I want.
We use it to light off hay meadows, pastures and lawns that need old grass cleaned off. I burn my yard every spring. The native bluestem (Calamagrastis Canadensis) gets six foot tall every summer, if it's not kept grazed or mowed down.
It's a common practice in this area to burn the meadows every spring, right before greenup, and has been since the 1930's, when the first homesteaders showed up. It helps keep encroaching willows beat back, too.
We also use the weed burner, AKA The Tiger Torch, to light the woodstove and the shop stove, to preheat the engines on our diesel farm tractor and various bulldozers in the winter, and recently used it to fire the pressure canner to steam open an ABS waterline with a 40' plug of ice in it. (That took 3 days.)
I've heard that you can use a weed burner to burn green weeds back, but have never seen anyone use one for that.
Jan in Alaska
--
Bedouin proverb: If you have no troubles, buy a goat.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Ahh, I wish that burning off meadows was still available here (NH) but alas the air pollution folks managed to get it outlawed.
Yes weed burners have many uses, melting ice in winter is another.
I use it on green weeds but only individually, not an area burn.
John
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The only air pollution troubles we have up here is when a volcano goes off or when we get a big forest fire. There are 600,000 people in Alaska, on a land mass of ~550 million acres. Not enough cars and no factories to produce air you can see. Although due to terrain, some towns have outlawed woodstoves without catalytic converters. (Juneau is one.) And Fairbanks sits in a bowl, just like Lost Angeles, but in Fairbanks, it's ice fog that lays in the bowl, not smog. (Ice fog is when moisture in the air freezes and turns to fog. It's a real trip to see for the first time. It happens at about -45F. or colder.)
For winter ice, I get buckets of beach sand/small gravel to spread, when I'm down there after storms gathering seaweed to lay on the garden beds.
My whole yard is weeds. I'm trying to convert a wilderness to a garden, one little bit at a time. But some of the weeds are really cool wildflowers, so they get to stay...
Jan in Alaska
--
Bedouin proverb: If you have no troubles, buy a goat.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

We have ice fog here (Indiana) sometimes, too, and it doesn't get that cold here. I have photos of my horses out in it, AAMOF. Or at least it's what they call "freezing fog" here. Is there a difference? To see photo which will tell you absolutely nothing except there is fog and horses, go to: http://community.webshots.com/user/deerhnd fourth page.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.