Problems with String Trimmer

I just bought my first string trimmer and have had problems with the deployment of the string. It is supposed to be an automatic deployment, but the string seems to get tangled, especially in taller grass, and deploys a large amount of string and the two strands get twisted together. Is there something I am doing to cause this, or did I just purchase a poorly designed trimmer?
Sherwin D.
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sherwindu wrote:

Likely it is just a poorly designed trimmer. One thing that could be causing the problem (not likely since you just bought it) is that you are using the wrong size string.
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Bill R. (Ohio Valley, U.S.A)

Gardening Since 1969
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sherwindu wrote:

In my limited experience, if you have a dual line trimmer, return it or sell it in a garage sale. I HATED mine. I now have a single line B&D that works well. Also, if you rewind your own line from bulk, do not wind it tightly.
Carl
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to reply, change ( .not) to ( .net)

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On Sat, 29 Apr 2006 15:59:50 GMT

I used to have a Ryobi with a bump head to let line out. It worked just fine, but basically after 5 years of heavy use the engine died. I now use an Echo, with a manual feed line dispenser. Just got done with the first use of it this year, about 2 hours worth. It started on the second pull, and worked (as usual) without a hitch. I had to let out line once during the session. I use the heavy gauge star line, it holds up well even against stone walls and around fence posts, or in brambles for that matter.
These are both dual line machines, and I've never had a problem, although there is the occasional headache of loading the head.
The Echo is certainly a very fine machine, and powerful too. I sometimes use the blade for heavy brush cutting, but not often.
-E
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Emery Davis
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Emery Davis wrote:

I've tried the blade but was not realy impressed.
The plastic 'string' seems to wear out to quickly and needs frequent feading out. With the blade giving mixed results I've often toyed with the idea of using a lenght of steel fishing trace. You'd need to put on full combat gear and declare a 100 mile no-go zone, but it should get the job done. :)
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I use an insanely sharp scythe for the whole lawn as well as trimming.
It has to be a hobby to do the whole lawn with one, but trimming is not out of the question, except they're kind of expensive.
www.scythesupply.com has the right kind but the ``kit'' will run you something under $200.
Get the large anvil and cross peen hammer and fine stone (you see complications already coming up) so that peening leaves the blade sharp rather than, like the jig, dull. Peen excessively, for grass, is the secret, and hone often.
It's not like there's a rush. You're out of the house because you want to be out of the house.
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Ron Hardin
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On Sun, 30 Apr 2006 16:50:54 +1200

[]
I don't use the blade very often either. Not sure I used it all last year, in fact.
Sounds like you're using light line. It comes in different diameters, I believe the starline I use is 3 mm. It really doesn't wear out all that fast.
They make line -- can't remember the name -- with a steel wire running inside the plastic. I tried it but actually found it wore out faster than the starline. And of course because it doesn't have the star shaped cross-section, it cut a little less clean. So I've still got the reel of it around somewhere.
I like the idea of tougher line, but really you want the line to break if it hits something too hard, not dig into brick or whatever. Not to mention the no-go zone!
I never used protective clothing with the Ryobi (which was no doubt very foolish) but the Echo is too powerful not to. Even with my work suit I've gotten some cuts on the arms from errant pebbles. So, no steel line for me, thanks!
-E
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Emery Davis
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I have a dual feed automatic Stehil and it works great as long as I don't try to run the string too long.
From Mel & Donnie in Bluebird Valley
http://community.webtv.net/MelKelly/TheKids
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Ryobi used to be a good machine. Not anymore. Echo is my next choice...CHA-CHING!!! It seems that people are willing to my $$$ for less hassell and heartache these days...brands that used to be good are crap now. Go figure.
Dave...down in Florida

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Consider it punishment for your usually skewed perspectives...
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What I really consider is that you are a complete idiot!
tom Jaszewski wrote:

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