Problems by humans on trees

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symplastless wrote:
It's only been 2 days since your last cut and paste message. I don't think increasing the frequency is a good thing.
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Unless you have a comment on trees and their proper care, please reframe from your negative attacks.
--
Sincerely,
John A. Keslick, Jr.
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On Thu, 29 Nov 2007 08:10:38 -0500, "symplastless"

John, I have to tell you, based on your behavior, constant spamming with your links, and ongoing taunting, I wouldn't call you as an arborist if you were the last one on earth.
I understand you are passionate about this, but give it a break, man. Nobody asked you to constantly post links over and over ad nauseum. You turn off many people and it isn't because your information is not right, it's the presentation. It's old aready.
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Jangchub wrote:

Add to it a lot of his stuff is not right, and you see the problem.
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--
Sincerely,
John A. Keslick, Jr.
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On Thu, 29 Nov 2007 09:48:41 -0600, "D. Staples"

I'm as tired as anyone of the constant repetition, but please direct me to any information he has provided that is not accurate.
Keith Babberney ISA Certified Arborist #TX-0236AT
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wrote:

You're right. Its accurate to say if you plant tree too deep, it will have problems. (Then, leave you hanging exactly how deep you should plant a tree...) (Of course its a generic tree since it addresses no specific species). (Of course, the depth of planting too deep is never defined...)
Strangely unspecific, generic and nowhere to go...
Oh, the generic tree. Should we rake up the leaves under the generic tree in fall, or leave them be (Y/N)? No specifics, please. No weblinks, thanks. Dave
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"Dioclese" <NONE> wrote in message wrote:

Planting southern yellow pine for forestry application recommends planting above the root collar, just enough to cover it.
As for your last question, is the generic tree in what zone? Wild or cultivated?
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On Sun, 2 Dec 2007 01:16:28 -0600, "Dioclese" <NONE> wrote:

put it this way, it is ultimately always better to plant ANY tree too shallow than it is too deeply. The root or trunk flare must be above ground on any tree, period the end.
Raking leaves is a good idea when it comes to fruit trees. The leaves, fruit droppings and pits or seeds can carry disease so should be removed. For ornamental trees it is best to leave the litter, but in that case I would recommend you shred them with your lawn mower first.
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wrote:

Agreed. But, what is too shallow, what is too deep for ANY tree? The weblink Symplastless said to go to has no reference. No tree specified. No depth specified. Leaves the reader hanging, wondering "now what?" in exactly what is too deep or too shallow. Remember, no species of tree is mentioned.
Was hoping one of the posters who advertised themselves a arborist would jump in for an appropriate answer. Should have known better....

Okay. Common trees in our area. Native Live oak (early spring only leaves), Native Juniper ashe - blueberry (needles fall anytime), Pecan (leaves in fall season). Some Yankees are saying to keep the leaves raked up due to what you said on fruit trees applies to ALL trees I've read in similar newsgroup. Course, the common sense types have said "poppycock" as nature shows otherwise in a natural setting. Dave
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"Dioclese" <NONE> wrote in message
Simple. You plant the tree, whatever species, most of the time, at the depth the roots come off the trunk. people here plant trees so deep the branches are coming out of the ground.
Do you know the anatomy differences between a woody root and a woody stem? Trees do not have root flares, they have trunk flares. You should look ariound and find a tree biology workshop to attend. Then you will be able to answer your own question.
Roots down, stem up. Mulch to be kept at least 6" from the trunk flare. 3-4 inches thich and flat. Whatever species. Its not rocket science.
Get the book MODERN ARBORICULTURE to learn about trees. I will bet you never read the book. Yet you complain about poor instructions. MA is a lucid book. READ! READ! READ! THINK! THINK! THINK! PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE. Can't afford the book. Come visit me and I will give you one. What more can I offer you? Other than that maybe you don't like trees? I do not know!
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On Mon, 3 Dec 2007 17:16:17 -0600, "Dioclese" <NONE> wrote:

When you dig a hole for a tree to be planted, the hole should be no less than twice the size of the root ball. If the tree is in a container, the same rule applies. Keeping in mind the bottom of the hole where you'll insert the tree will need to be roughed up. Better, first, when you dig a hole to plant a tree it should not be smooth. It should be jagged and have rough sides which you can achieve with the spade by jutting it in the sides of the hole and bottom. This aids the roots until they develop and can push through more dense soil.
The plant or tree in the container or balled and burlap then goes in the hole you freshly dug and where you see the level of soil around the tree IN the container, is where your general guide is. Do not plant the tree (of any kiind) any deeper than where it is in the container.
Now, there is another rub, the tree industry is notorious for planting the tree too deeply in the container! In that instance you should pull the soil away from the bark of the containerized plant until you can see the flare at the bottom of the tree and keeping in mind the soil in the hole will settle, place the tree into the hole with the understanding the tree will settle deeper than you originally planted it. So, the level of soil the tree is in, IN the container, should never be below any of the freshly dug hole.
One last thing (and ask further questions if you need to know more); never amend the soil which you will backfill the hole with. ONLY use the native soil which came out of the hole and do not add anything to it. By amending the soil you are setting up a condition for the tree to be in a "container" in the soil and roots will wrap around and around in the hole the way it does in container. Eventually, the tree will decline. Just use the soil as is to fill it back in and then water it slowly for a good period of time to get that soil really wet.
I did leave out one step; always thoroughly soak the roots while it is still in the container. Make certain that root ball is completely saturated and if you use liquid seaweed to water it while still in the container it will greatly increase root development and help with the stress of transplantation.

Yeah, well...

The only trees I rake the fallen leaves away from are fruit trees. That doesn't mean I don't mulch them. I use fresh mulch every year and I avoid mulch made of walnut trees.
For live oaks I always leave the dropped leaves in spring. I have several old growth live oaks which are doing very well and I never remove the leaves. Every other year I may vacuum them so they get chopped up in the blower and I put them back down in shredded form. It helps the macro and micro organisms digest them.
I hope this helps. If now, keep asking. Trees are the most valuable items you can add to your home which will give you back twenty times the amount you paid for them when you do sell the house.
Victoria
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wrote:

Easy enough, check his so called dictionary, start at forestry. You are apparently a certified Texas arboist, he is a tree hacker.
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I am sorry about the repetition. I do not repeat as much as humans are incorrectly treating the trees. That is what really gets old is the false advice and low quality tree care that takes place. Just look at the way people mulch the trees. Its sad. I will keep with the same message. However, if Don Staples can provide data that is peer reviewed and published that suggest I am wrong, I would be happy. However, its just a matter of name slinging and noise. Not to mention the fowl language. Where is your definition of a forest or forestry Don Staples? At least I define my terms. You present noise. Look that one up after forestry.
Beware of so called foresters who do not understand the ecological stages of trees with respect to the chemistry between them and their associates!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
--
Sincerely,
John A. Keslick, Jr.
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Fowl (?) language, sorry I don't speak bird.

Sorry, I have not and will not produce a useless so called dictionary. Your definetions in your terms has little to do with reality.
Peer review and published? Where is your peer review, tree hacker? Where have you published, other than your web site, and there usually reposts of Dr. Shigo's work.

Beware of so called consulting arborists that have never studied biology, and never was an certified arborist.
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--
Beware of so called foresters who do not understand the ecological stages of
trees with respect to the chemistry between them and their
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Mr. Don
"Here I am" - teaching tree biology at ASU. http://www.treedictionary.com/DICT2003/T/teaching.html How do you explain that Mr. Expert or so called expert that believes to understand tree biology one MUST belong to a trade association. You are wrong. I belong to ADP. I guess you do not know what that is.
http://www.alleghenydefense.org /
You probably believe if we do not cut trees we can not wipe our butt. How about separating the forest from the tree farms and legalizing commercial hemp? What about that Mr. expert.
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Sincerely,
John A. Keslick, Jr.
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symplastless wrote:

So, show your education that you are a "teacher". By definitions in your personal dictionary, you can be a teacher, just not certified, huh, consulting arboist?
I wait with bated breath your definition of what professional organization ADP represents, and when you joined, if it is such.

Hemp has been discredited for years, why do you continue?
Again, consulting arboist/tree biologist, show me where I claimed to be anything but a forester.
Beware a semi literate clown calling himself a consulting arboist.
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It is odd D. Staples, you never defend yourself. You only attack others. What are your credentials and/or authority which make you capable of judging the work of others?
--

Billy

Bush & Cheney, Behind Bars
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