Problem with Peppers

I have a pepper plant that was growing great. It had 2 peppers and several blosooms. This week the blooms turned yellow and began to fall off. One of the peppers developed a dimes-sized, brown spot wihich is soft. There is no bug holes. Does anything know what is happening. My other pepper plants are not as robust but they seem to be healthy.
Thanks,
Phil
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I've got the brown, soft spots on some of my peppers that are a variety somewhat like green bell peppers. It looks and acts a little like the blossom end rot that affects some of my tomatoes. Not an answer, but join you in asking the question! Lynn in NW Washington State
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Since last Friday the weather has become extremely humid (Humidity 89%, Dew Point 73%, Temps in the low 90's) I wonder if this is the cause of the brown spots and bloom loss?
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Not sure, but aren't peppers on the list of plants you shouldn't handle a lot when the leaves are wet, due to the risk of spreading disease? If so, don't weed around them etc etc....
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One of the things that I've always liked about peppers is their freedom from fungal diseases. Bugs will bite holes in the leaves and fruit - miserable grasshoppers, but I've never had problems spreading diseases when picking them when they were damp. But then, I've never encountered a fungal disease in peppers in all my many years of gardening.
I've raised many varieties of peppers over the years and found that the "hot" varieties were easier to raise than the sweet bells. Most of the hot varieties start setting fruit on much smaller plants and produce far more fruit. Bells often abort small fruit from small plants or produce blossoms that fell off without setting. I've found that this is also the case when a sweet bell on a good sized plant set a number of peppers. At a certain point they reach their limit and drop any new fruit that happens to set. If you want to keep a sweet bell producing, pick the fruit as soon as they reach usable size. If you happen to like ripe bells, be prepared for about a third of the production. That's probably why they're far more expensive in produce section than green bells.
JPS
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