Potting Soil vs. Potting Mix

What is the difference between "Potting Soil" and "Potting Mix"? Also, if you were to make your own potting mix or potting soil what would it consist of?
Thanks
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On 4/10/2008 11:59 AM, ewl wrote:

I call it "potting mix" because I mix it myself. I don't think "soil" would be correct because, in my case, there is no soil from the garden in it.
My recipe is at <http://www.rossde.com/garden/garden_potting_mix.html .
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David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean
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wrote:

This is an interesting question. I used to make my own potting soil (garden soil, peat moss, vermiculite, whiting). It had to be screened, mixed, baked and fluffed. It is so much easier to buy bags of general potting soil or soil "mixes" formulated for specific plants (cactus, African violets, orchids, etc). I guess few gardeners make their own potting soil today, but it is no more difficult than baking a cake.
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I hate peat moss because pH can drop to 5.0 within a month unless I dump in a ton of lime. So much better to concoct my own mix, from a coco coir base if I can get it or equal parts homegrown vermicompost and vermiculite. Doing without salt-based fertilizers means I can reuse the soil instead of dumping it at season's end.
Has anyone found bagged mixes that _aren't_ fertilized or based on peat?
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In article

Close but no cigar.
Bill
<http://www.johnnyseeds.com/catalog/product.aspx?scommand=search&search=9 227&item’27>
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Garden in shade zone 5 S Jersey USA
MaCain in 2038 !!
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On 4/10/2008 7:06 PM, Father Haskell wrote:

Many flowering plants prefer an acidic environment. Since the water in my area is alkaline, an acidic mix (per my recipe) is quite appropriate. The native soils are even more alkaline. I rarely see lime at any of the nurseries I visit.
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David E. Ross
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Baltimore's tap water is 7.5. Still, every time I use peat-based mixes, they go to 4.5 within a month despite stabilization with dolomite at 1 cup per gallon soil.
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2nd question response. Sandy loam, pine bark 5%, food green leftovers. Stew for a month in warm weather, keep it moist. Bear in mind that "sandy loam" is difficult to get a consistent definition for.
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Dave



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