Potted perennials

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As I have said before, Hortus III was already out-of-date by the time it was published. Most of the contributions were made by grad students and not the experts in the various plant groups and it shows. Many of the contributors did not do their homework nor did the consult the most recent literature at the time. The book got much harsh criticism by reviewers when it came out.
The treatment of succulent plants was inconsistent and in many cases completely wrong.
Coleus was already an obsolete genus at the time and merged with Plectranthus but it was completely missed.
Many other obsolete genera were also included as if they were valid.
The book is a mess.
*********************
Since Organic Gardening has become little more than a cult, you can imagine what I would say about their lame encyclopedia series.
The Roger Phillips and Martin Rix books are pretty good as far as they go but they are not complete in their coverage.

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I tend to agree with you there. It's very hard for me to follow well. I only have it because my friend who is 82 gave it to me to pass it along. It's more a tome than anything else. And it has her name inside it. (I also have some cherished plants that will always be my "Mary Emma's" that I take with me thru the years but having a few books and things are nice reminders of wonderful gardeners and what helped them along. Mary Emma used her Hortus enough that the pages have dirt on them........
Most of the contributions were made by grad students and not the

I don't listen to critics sometimes because they've got their own opinions and not always are they correct. Like the criticism of the movie, Barbarosa with Willie Nelson and Gary Busey. It's a great movie, but the critics tore it up when it came out. I still like it and watch it when I happen across it as well as own a copy of it <g> but I still agree that it wasn't as informative as other books I've got.

and there you and I agree. I have many books regarding cacti and succulents. Still haven't found the definitive book on them, though.

like it was just filler to bulk up the book.

agreed. I don't consult it enough to warrent it's usage. I use my A-Z and Rix books more.

I understand. And I no longer subscribe to the magazine anymore. I have the books because when I was fledgling and before I started the master gardening classes, I absorbed any information I could, and I have to say that for the novice who is starting out and wants to be more organic, it's not a bad way to learn. Beginners need to start somewhere. and I never turn my nose down at my early teachers. Lame as you say, but I have respect that when they were published, they taught the basic gardening stuff that the common person could understand. The magazine and organization never was the same after Rodale and McGrath were gone. Rodale was getting too politically and active regarding food, and I have a feeling I know where he'd be right now if he had lived. Fighting for no dabblings in genetics and seed germination control and what not. Mike McGrath was an excellent editor and writer with a great humor. Down home. I return for basic reminders more than anything.

If there ever were a complete coverage on the plants, they would be huge tomes of pictures and pages and pages and weigh pounds..........I'm happy with what I have right now and don't think I'll be getting rid of some of them soon. I do have a collection of them that could go to the bookstore to recycle to someone who would get something out of, but the bulk of my gardening books are keepers for me until I'm too old to read and enjoy them. then I'll pass them on to a library or my daughter if she is still gardening at that point since they have a bit of me in them and would serve as keepsakes. enough jabber, good points all. madgardener
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We are not talking about art.
We are talking about what is supposed to be based in science but gets messed up when it is practiced by gardeners.

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wrote:

Thanks for correction - but I'm still puzzled how I googled the other Latin term.
You didn't "offend"; far from it.
I wrote because, as I said earlier, having been in the word business all my life, I know how people can use terminology without being aware of how it got into the language.
Someone else made a comment that made me think they really didn't understand what "wandering Jew" means. I won't go into detail here, but if you want to send an email address, I can send a brief history.
Peace, indeed!
Persephone
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hey Kate.......madgardener here (I grew up and lived most of my life in Nashville). Question........the carnations that you have....did you get them at a nursery? Or at Kroger or a grocery in the florist section? And a type of wandering jew? I can say the wandering Jew won't survive the hard frost that is coming your way. Is it all purple? There are several types of wandering vine-like plants in the Tradescantia family. "Wandering Jew" or Inch plant won't hold up to temperatures below 40o You can bring it in and give the long stems a haircut and root them to make another pot or plant them into the soil with the rest of the plants.
The purple one is Setcreasea purpurea known as purple boat or Purple heart. That has to come in as well. I know the nurseries sell it as a ground cover, but it's not hardy I myself have the Siderasis or Brown Spiderwort, which I didn't want to lose so I brought mine in Friday. There is also a variety of Tradescantia called Zebrina which is also known as Wandering Jew, way more colorful with leaves green, silver, edged in pink or green, and purple, or even green, silver, pink and red. These can't survive past 40o outside.
Now the Bee Balm.......Yes, it can survive in a container. But honestly, either plant it today, or heel it in until spring, mounding leaves around the pot to protect the sides against the cold, winds. If you can get a shovel into the ground, you could plunge the pot and all into a hole, but if I were you, I'd plant the Monarda and mark the spot with the lable and whack the stems back to within three inches tall and water it well and forget about it. Come springtime you'll see little triangles coming up where you planted the clump, and before you know it, they will have quietly risen up to become those great stems with the flowers that hummers love so well. I've taken to putting one of those garden grids over mine as they tend to flop due to the raised soil being a bit too rich for them. But in regular and poor soil, they flourish and stand more upright like they're supposed to. I'd even say the second and third year when they start bulking up and spreading, to cut them back when they get to two foot tall to make them branch. They're tough. Members of the mint family.
Hope this helps! <g> madgardener up on the ridge, back in Fairy Holler, overlooking English Mountain in Eastern Tennessee, zone 7, Sunset zone 36
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wrote:

My gardening experience near San Francisco taught me that it will live quite happily at temperatures below 40. It won't survive a hard freeze, though.
My email address is LLM041103 at earthlink dot net.
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madgardener wrote:

I started them from seed this year. They didn't bloom. Hopefully next year. I think they're hardy to zone 3 or 4.

All purple with light purple blooms. A friend gave me cuttings. She has them everywhere and leaves them out, but in great big tubs.

That's it! I guess they do have to come in - rats! (I made the mistake of seperating one of the Aloe from it's pups - now I've got 10 aloes, one bay tree and 2 window boxes of Setcreasea purpurea to over winter inside - groan.)
I know the nurseries sell it as a ground cover,

Thanks, Mad! We got a wee bit of rain this morning and now it's quite balmy. I may just got out and put the balm and carnations in the ground.
Kate
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snipppppppppppppp>>>> prune>>>>>>>>>>> whack>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> I started them from seed this year. They didn't bloom. Hopefully next

yeppers, yer dead on there........ sniiiiiiiiiiiiippppppp>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

good to know my extensive research tracked your specific plant down. Now as to the next statement............

Jonathan, here in Eastern Tennessee, they hang in there fairly well below 40o, but they pout and mush out below 38o. The purple one that people buy at Lowes and Home Despot as "tender perennials" are just annuals. they make impressive clumps of color, beautiful little pink flowers nestled at the tips of the purple leaves and darker reddish purple stems, but hardy? nope. not here. We're not in the least like San Francisco. I'm sure you get snow......probably get frosts, and the occaisonal freeze, and if you were to maintain those cold temperatures, you'd find that below 40o the plant would not only suffer but would croak. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

wish we'd gotten some of that rain, but it slid past us here in the foothills of the Smokies. Planting your babies you grew from seed is the best thing for them. You have a window of time to plug them in right now...... sunny spot for both of them by the way......now for Persephone........... you might find it offensive that the common name for some of these plants is 'Wandering Jew', but in my English book, " The Houseplant Expert" written by Dr. D.G. Hessayon, under Tradescantia, the common name for two varieties of these plants be they Tradescantia fluminensis, variegata which is LISTED IN THE BOOK as Tradescantia: Wandering Jew with (Inch Plant) underneath this in parenthesis, on page 221, or Zebrina pendula or purpusii, or Z. pendula quadricolor, which is also listed as Wandering Jew with (Inch Plant) in parenthesis underneath.
I'm sure Cereus will fill us in as to the location of the originality of these plants, (thanks Fashizzel!), but honestly, if you're offended that someone at sometime back who knows when, decided that a common name for a trailing vine/ground cover would be Wandering Jew, then so what? I swear, I think sometimes that some people are too thin skinned and politically correct. And by the way, JEWS call each other JEWS. It's not like it has a derogatory common name of N. vine.....................(and I won't use that one because it IS offensive to people and I, despite the fact that I am very Southern, will not go there.........) So please lighten up, Persephone. Now I'm gonna duck behind this here bush hoping to avoid the flame or food fight and hope that Zhan comes to my rescue!.............. madgardener up on the ridge, back in Fairy Holler, overlooking English Mountain in Eastern Tennessee, zone 7, Sunset zone 36

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wrote:

Understood, YMMV with climate, species, or just the side of the hill you're on.

Snow was very rare; frost was a regular occurrence. In the coldest part of winter, lows were typically around freezing, and highs were 10-15 higher. But in most winters there were stretches of several days at a time when the temperature did not rise above 40 much, if at all.
I will not presume to tell you that wandering Jew will survive winter in Tennessee (if you have hard freezes it certainly won't), but the variety I knew was quite tolerant of temperatures below 40 for periods of days, at least.
My email address is LLM041103 at earthlink dot net.
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madgardener wrote: <weeded out>

They're in the ground and in the sun. This has been a hard growing season here in TN this year, as I'm sure you know. The rain pretty much stopped in July. I lost several white pines and a young blue spruce and I'm still trying to keep 3 douglas firs going. Ah well, I'm a Red Sox fan - there's always next year.
Kate
......now for

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I would plant the bee balm right into the ground. the carnations we get here ( might be too cold) are just annuals so either enjoy them now till the die off or bring them in. probablt different where you live. I still haven't planted my garlic yet . I did just have fresh carrots and parsnips out of the garden yesterday for a soup, Yum
--
:) Lynn
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Lynn wrote:

The bee balm and carnations are in the ground. I'm still getting okra, tomatoes and peppers (and the rosemary and rue are blooming again.)
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its a good thing to put things right into the ground especially if u ge
heavy frosts or snow. unless u have the really heavy black rubber typ pots that a few garden centers have. where i worked they had th heavier pots so u could get away with leaving some things to winte over as long as they were in a sheltered area out of really direct col winds. good luck with all your perennials hopefully they will survive to giv u lots of beauty this coming year. : sockiecat.
Lynn wrote:
I would plant the bee balm right into the ground. the carnations w get here ( might be too cold) are just annuals so either enjoy them now til the die off or bring them in. probablt different where you live. I still haven't planted my garlic yet . I did just have fresh carrot and parsnips out of the garden yesterday for a soup, Yum
The bee balm and carnations are in the ground. I'm still getting okra, tomatoes and peppers (and the rosemary and rue are blooming again
-- sockiescat
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