Potatoes dying off - normal?

I planted a patch of potatoes mid spring. My girls took a bad of rotten potatoes that had started to grow, cut them up, and buried them. The plants grew like crazy, hit about 3 feet tall. Now, they are starting to die for no reason that I can see. Is this normal? I thought they would grow until frost killed them. There are no diseases I'm aware, no obvious insect damage. Plus I can actually see the tops of several potatoes on the surface, is that also normal? Never grown potatoes before, did not know what to expect.
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Probably ready to eat. Dig some up and check them out.
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Yup.. That's what potatoes do from what I've seen.. We already ate ours and the kids had fun digging them up.. Ours were the small red variety and were yummy!
You can let them stay in the ground for a while if you don't want to get them all out at the same time -- at least from what I've seen. Our plants were all but dead for probably a month here in the LA area and I when we dug them up, they were still just as good -- no problems at all..
-- Rick
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Rick F. In article snipped-for-privacy@corp.supernews.com, Pat wrote:
"Zootal" snipped-for-privacy@zootal.nospam.com wrote in message
I planted a patch of potatoes mid spring. My girls took a bad o rotten potatoes that had started to grow, cut them up, and buried them. Th plants grew like crazy, hit about 3 feet tall. Now, they are starting to di for no reason that I can see. Is this normal? I thought they would gro until frost killed them. There are no diseases I'm aware, no obvious insect damage. Plus I can actually see the tops of several potatoes on the surface, is that also normal? Never grown potatoes before, did no know what to expect.
Probably ready to eat. Dig some up and check them out.
Yup.. That's what potatoes do from what I've seen.. We already ate our and the kids had fun digging them up.. Ours were the small red variety and wer yummy!
You can let them stay in the ground for a while if you don't want t get them all out at the same time -- at least from what I've seen. Our plant were all but dead for probably a month here in the LA area and I when we dug the up, they were still just as good -- no problems at all..
-- Rick
yup sounds like u got taters there ready for the plate lol. one thin that i would do though if u are planning on keeping your potatoes i the ground for a little while is to hoe up the ground on either side o the potatoes--this is called hilling and should be done throughout th growing season of potatoes--to cover up any potatoes that are showin so that the potatoes dont turn green in colour from exposure t sunlight as green potatoes arent good to eat. good luck and hope u get a bountiful harvest :). cyaaaa, sockiescat
-- sockiescat
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Did you hill the potatoes. Alot of times when you have alot of vines, you will have a smaller yeild. Try digging into the side of the hill and see if they are of a good size. You may want to use them as "new" potatoes in a pot of green beans. Zootal wrote:

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Newbie to the group, hope you don't mind me butting in. Your spuds are probably ready to eat. The plants die back and the spuds form a tougher skin. Tougher meaning they won't peel when you dig them. If/ when you see them peaking out of the ground, you should cover them with dirt. The sun will cause them to turn green. I find the green part to be bitter. Someone mentioned hilling. This is done so the spuds will stay closer to the surface for digging, if they don't have to go down , they won't. Been enjoying most of the reading I have done here. Nice group. Doris Zootal wrote:

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Yeah, I've learned a lot here, and alway get answers.
So - what are the odds of planting potatoes again, now, mid July, and getting something before winter? It seems to me that these potatoes were only in the ground for a few months, I'm thinking I might be able to get a second crop to grow.

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Zootal wrote:

I live in NY, not sure where you live. We plant in April and are just starting to pick small spuds. For another year, you could plant 2 weeks apart til the end of your planting season. Should be interesting. Spuds are a storage crop so planting more than one doesn't seem to gain you anything in storage. YMMV Doris
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On 18 Jul 2006 04:50:55 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Not sure where you are but here in Southern NH (zone 5A) my potatoes are still growing a nice healthy green. They do not die back, normally, until fall.
However, they do die back abnormally and mine have for the past two years due to late blight which also affects my tomatoes. I am treating both for late blight this year and am successful so far. I hope that is not your problem, if so, they are goners.
John
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wrote:

I'm not sure - the plants don't look specifically diseased, they just turn yellow and die back, some are still green. My tomatoes are as healthy as can be. The spuds we have dug up have been good - in fact, BBQ some in foil over a charcoal grill with olive oil and cajun.....mmmm...they are to die for :-) I'll never buy spuds at a store again!
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On Tue, 18 Jul 2006 21:36:34 -0700, "Zootal"

<snip>
Yup. Many of my non-gardening friends and relatives ask why I grow something as cheap as potatoes. Then I feed them some of mine and they understand.
I think that it is sad that so many people never taste fresh fruits and vegetables, only the cardboard replicas that they get at the grocery store.
When I was growing up in West Virginia, everyone had a small backyard garden. My grandfather and favorite uncle had big gardens. I followed their method and do not regret it a bit. I have lots of fresh vegetables all summer and some into winter. I still have good butternuts from last year! Wish I could remember how I did that.
John
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John Bachman wrote:

TLC tender loving care Doris
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Zootal wrote:

I have been planting potatoes continuously in SE Michigan. out of a bag of potatoes that we are not eating (not with many potato plants being ready). Those I planted 3 weeks ago are already one foot tall, and I planted another 20 two days ago. I have another dozen to plant as soon as they sprout. Basically, in summer we buy very little bread and eat potatoes several nights a week.
In two months of warm weather they will give you some smaller, yet perfectly edible, potatoes. So go ahead and plant. In my case, the potatoes that I plant with irrigation in compost mounds grow to 2.5 ft and continue to grow until frost, making large potatoes. Those that I plant in places with little compost and no irrigation (also in April) grow to 1.5 ft, usually die off as you describe around July 1, and produce smaller, fewer potatoes of course. Younger potatoes are the best to eat anyway, so even if frost comes early you will enjoy them.
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