Pole Saw Advice

Hello All,
I need to cut four small hazelnut trees growing on an embankment near my house. From what I can judge they are around 2-3m in height and the thickest branches are around 30-40mm in diameter.
I have never done this kind of thing before and had even contemplated the risky idea of climbing on to the embankment to cut them! Then I saw a pole saw in my local hardware store by accident and that set me on the right track.
However, I still remain a novice here. The choice of pole saws appears bewildering. There are manual ones with blades that look absolutely deadly, corded and corded electric versions as well as petrol driven ones (which I would not want to use). The cheapest manual saws are quite cheap (the right side of 50) and the cheapest electric ones are not that much more expensive.
What are the dos and donts that I need to be aware of here? Do manual saws really work or is it worth spending a bit more to avoid the grunt work and danger and get an electric one instead? If so, what are the features to look for?
As you can see - a novice. Any help would be much appreciated.
--
FredAt


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/28/2011 11:06 PM, FredAt wrote:

It is not clear whether your intent is to cut down the trees in question entirely or simply to prune them. Either way, if these trees are the sole reason for buying the saw then I'd skip the purchase entirely and pay someone to whack them. Surely there is someone in your vicinity with the requisite skills (minimal) and the desire for a quick fifty quid (great) willing to put in the hour's work.
Of course if your saw need is driven by other trimming jobs and these are not numerous and the trees are not large then a high-quality manual pole saw will probably suffice. I've been using a Fiskars extendible saw/pruner for more than ten years now with good results. The one I have is like this
http://www2.fiskars.com/Products/Yard-and-Garden/Tree-Pruners/12-ft.-Tree-Pruner
but it appears that it may not be sold in the UK (safety regulations?) or maybe I'm simply misreading their website. The blade is wicked sharp and the lopper works well up to its capacity. In any case something similar from another maker would probably serve as well.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
John McGaw;945925 Wrote: > On 12/28/2011 11:06 PM, FredAt wrote:-

> my

> saw

> the

> appears

>

> sole

>

>

> are

>

> saw/pruner

> this

> (http://tinyurl.com/cjltfyn )

> or

>

>

Thank you for the tip. I live in Luxembourg so the chances of getting someone to do the job for me for 50 quid are next to negligible. Multiply that by 5 and maybe... . That apart the trees are doing a great job of stablizing the embankment so I want to leave them and just prune them down. I had the job done 3 years ago when I had the house built so I guess I need to repeat it on a 3 year cycle which is why I thought of buying my own.
I have found Fiskars pole saws in my local DIY stores. Is it really feasible to hold and manipulate a pole that is 2+m long?
--
FredAt


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It's not easy. Far from it. For trimming trees there's nothing as easy to use as a lopper:
http://tinyurl.com/c4u5tkk
I've seen tree guys use one of these:
http://tinyurl.com/bpnht96
The one pictured has a 12ft reach (3.6 meters).
Good idea to leave the tree. Pruning will make it stronger.
--
Dan Espen

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
FredAt wrote:

yes
D
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 30 Dec 2011 09:54:21 +1100, "David Hare-Scott"

Yes indeedy... I use my 16 footer fully extended with no problem. Just don't force it, let the saw teeth do the cutting at their own pace. Actually there are times I could use one that is longer.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 29/12/2011 17:20, FredAt wrote:

A possible alternative is to get hold of a decent quality flexible or wire saw at a camping/survival store. Attach a suitable cord (nylon clothes line should be ok) to one end. Tie a weight to the other end of the cord and lob that over the tree trunk. Pull it down, remove the weight, and tie it to the free end of the wire saw. Pull up the saw until it is in the position you want the cut to take place. By using this method you can easily cut the tree, as the full force of your pull and the sawing motion is applied to the cut. Repeat for the other trees.
--

Jeff

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 12/29/2011 12:20 PM, FredAt wrote:

snip...
I find that the Fiskars pole saw is fairly easy to handle even when extended to its maximum length (closer to 4m) and I am not what you'd call an outstanding physical specimen. The only real problem I've had is when I've tried to reach a limb for sawing that necessitates holding both of my arms high overhead and grasping just the end of the pole. Clearly I'm trying to do more than the saw is meant for but it certainly does tell me the next morning which muscles I abused in doing it. Within the saw's intended range -- no problems.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Manual pole saws are for trimming an occasional small limb. You have no hold on the limb to they are not as easy to use as they look.
Electric are easier but not suited for whole trees.
For a whole tree, and occasional use an electric chain saw it the preferred tool.
As for being afraid of climbing an embankment, that must be some embankment. Lay an extension ladder on the hill if you're worried about sliding down.
If you're still worried, hire a professional. Something like you describe won't cost much at all.
Also consider that trees hold embankments together so they don't collapse.
--
Dan Espen

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Your last comment is noteworthy... I'd not remove anything growing on a steep embankment. And hazelnut trees have great value for attracting wildlife. That said I have Fiskar's 16' pole pruner, a fabulous tool, all Fiskar's products are top notch, I especially like their loppers. I'd not consider a power pole pruner unless one did trimming professionally and would use it often. Also a power pole pruner is a dangerous tool, plus it's just something more to maintain... the manual saw blade may need occasional replacement but only costs $10... if you're handy it can be easily dressed with a three cornered file.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
FredAt wrote:

I have one of these, which has a saw and loppers. It works well, even with the flexibility inherent in a fibreglass pole.
http://www.leevalley.com/US/garden/page.aspx?cat=2,42706&pY355
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

A manual one will do for you. You want saw and loper. Mine extends to about 14 feet and is not hard to handle fully extended. You can lop off stuff less than an inch and saw through maybe 6 inches. I have an older 8 foot one but bought newer a couple of years ago with more growth.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Frank;946474 Wrote: > On Dec 28 2011, 11:06*pm, FredAt snipped-for-privacy@gardenbanter.co.uk

> my

> saw

> the

> appears

I want to leave them and just prune them down. I had the job done 3 years ago when I had the house built so I guess I need to repeat it on a 3 year cycle which is why I thought of buying my own.
[image:
http://www.ukou.info/g.gif ]
--
zutou


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.