Please help me identify!

Hi everyone:
I'm a new homeowner, never really had much to do with a yard before. Now with summer upon us, I'm finding I really enjoy working in the yard...but for the most part, I don't know what I've got here. I'm sure it's nothing unusual, I'm just not knowledgeable yet. :)
Can someone help me by telling me what these are? Thanks!
http://www3.ns.sympatico.ca/kimberlyyoung/plants.html
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The first is forsythia - a pretty common shrub. Amazing you actually found a flower this late in the season - it tends to be one of the earliest shrubs to bloom in the spring.
The second looks like a variegated euonymus, most likely E japonicus 'Silver King'. You can prune it back hard without problem and be sure to remove any solid green branches.
The third looks like some sort of prunus (cherry family), but I can't tell exactly which species from the photo quality.
The last is a climbing honeysuckle, Lonicera spp. Various types can be rather weedy and invasive - others are very gardenworthy. Typically have a nice fragrance and attract hummingbirds.
pam - gardengal
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Hi Pam, thanks for the reply.
Now, a couple more questions if you don't mind.
The forsythia as I mentioned, has a single flower on it at the moment. It did have a few more earlier in the spring - but not many. I live in Atlantic Canada, so that could explain it blooming somewhat late. But why would so much of the plant not bear flowers? I do like them, perhaps it needs to be cut back? The suspected prunus, same thing. Most of it doesn't flower, and the flowers seem rather small compared to others I've seen. If pruning is required, do I do it now, or wait until after the winter?
Next question, the euonymus. Why do the solid green leaves need to be cut back, do they eventually take over the nice variegated leaves?
Thanks!
KD

yard...but
nothing
a
'Silver
any
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Often, when forsythias are not tended to for an extended period, they lose some of their flowering capacity. Rejuvenation of the shrub by removing one third of the oldest canes each year for 3 years will help. I have also known folks who have pruned them back nearly to the ground and they have come back strong, but it is not a method I'd recommend without reservation. Pruning at improper times can also affect flowering - immediately after flowering is best for these early spring bloomers. Avoid much fertilizing also - most shrubs seem to flower best with minimal chemical intervention.
Don't know what's up with the 'prunus' suspect, although the other responder has a good theory. Pretty much anything from the Prunus genus can be problematic - lots of disease and insect susceptibility.
Yes, allowing the fully green branches to remain on pretty much any variegated plant will continue to diminish the amount of variegation present. The green portions are genetically stronger and will eventually overwhelm the variegated tissue and the plant will become non-variegated in time.
HTH
pam - gardengal

Now
found
shrubs
tell
a
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one
known
back
I've done that. Worked like a charm. However, I'd turned the ground surrounding it into a bed where I grew Impatiens so it got a lot of water and a lot of Miracle Gro. ;-) Too shady to flower very well but boy that was one healthy bush and a great thing through which to grow shade tolerant clematis.
Jim
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http://images.google.com/images?q=Prunus%20tomentosa&hl=en&lr=&ie=UTF-8 &sa=N&tab=wi
like many prunus,it does well in dry summer areas. once established, they seem to live a long time around here. but i doubt they've been retailed here, so are uncommon.
somewhat better fruiting cvs for northern plains (IIRC) were named long ago:
http://www.google.com/search?sourceid=navclient&q=%22Prunus+tomentosa%22 +native+%7C+cultivars
they'd also been used as somewhat incompatible rootstocks for more desirable fruiting prunus.
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The third plant is flowering almond. It looks like you have brown rot. It won't kill the plant but you'll get die back after flowering every year. You can try fungicides, careful pruning and keeping the ground near it clean but that's a lot of work for us. After 10 years, we've finally replaced our sad shrub with a tree peony. Don't plant anything in the prunus family on that spot if you decide to replace it too.
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