Planting Trees

If a newly planted tree is declining because it has been planted too deep, it is best to start over again with a new healthy tree that is planted correctly.
---------------------------------------LINKS--------------------- TECHNO TREE BIOLOGY DICTIONARY online at http://www.treedictionary.com
Articles written by DR. ALEX L. SHIGO, one of the foremost authorities worldwide on tree systems today online at http://www.chesco.com/~treeman/SHIGO ---------------------------------------------------------------------------- Announcing the release of a 2-CD set by DR. SHIGO http://www.chesco.com/~treeman/CDS1.html
Sincerely,
John A. Keslick, Jr. Tree Biologist http://www.chesco.com/~treeman Beware of so-called TREE EXPERTS who do not understand TREE BIOLOGY!
About me - Some of my educational activities I have enjoyed are here http://www.chesco.com/~treeman/educat.html
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True sometimes John. I have dug up and reset trees up to 5 years after initial installation with good results.This is especially effective on large transplants because they have so much reserve they can keep going for a few years even if improperly planted.
IMO most landscapers have no idea about how to plant a tree, how to water, what species behave in what way, etc. Landscape Architects are slightly better, but are not around enough to make a real difference on most projects.
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Mike LaMana, MS
Heartwood Consulting Services, LLC
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Why would you think Landscape Architects better able to assess needs of plants installed in the landscape than those who work with them every day? IME, LA's (in general - no flames, please) have remarkably little horticultural knowledge, as plant husbandry or even basic ID is lacking from most LA curriculums. Nor are they very hands-on in the field. Of course there are both skilled and non-skilled landscapers, but as a professional in horticulture myself, if I were drawing up sides, I'd go with a working landscaper everytime before I'd ask an LA any question about plant care or culture. Spatial analysis or layout and basic design, yes, but plant selection or care - never.
pam - gardengal
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Pam - I agree with you to a degree, as the best horticulturists I know are landscapers. However, to become an LA one has to undergo a rigorous training that virtually assures they know a little about a lot of stuff, and lot about some stuff. I agree that in general these folks are horticulturally, botanically, and ecologically challenged -but they have had the benefit of some training in soils, plant science, plant ID, IPM, etc.
However, to be a landscaper (in most places and at most times) one has to have a pick up truck, a shovel, a mower, and some gumption - formal training of any sort be damned. No flames here please - I have billed myself as a landscaper for a portion of my career.
I know there are tons of exceptions, but after nearly 20 years at this these are my opinions today.
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Mike LaMana, MS
Heartwood Consulting Services, LLC
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