Planting grass where evergreen tree used to be

A recent storm knocked down one my evergreen trees which probably had a diameter of at least twenty feet, so nothing was growing underneath it. I plan to plant grass there, and since evergreen trees are acidic I was wondering if I should lime the area first. I plan to purchase some topsoil, and should I lime the area before I put the new topsoil on.
The area gets sun all day. I live in Pittsburgh, and what type of grass would be good to plant? I know there is the "Penn State Mix", and that is what I think I will plant when the local township dug up my yard last year to put a now drainage line in, they replant the area with the Penn State Mix. Thanks
Tom
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Why not take adavantage of the area and plant a new tree? Maybe another conifer. Correctly that is.
Planting http://home.ccil.org/~treeman/sub1.html and Look up "Tree Planting" http://www.treedictionary.com
- - Sincerely, John A. Keslick, Jr. Arborist http://home.ccil.org/~treeman and www.treedictionary.com Beware of so-called tree experts who do not understand tree biology. Storms, fires, floods, earthquakes, and volcanic eruptions keep reminding us that we are not the boss.
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I did not plant it. It was over forty years old and underneath an electrical line. Grass would be a better substitute, and I would plant another tree somewhere else when it would not compete with the electrical lines. When it went down, the electricity was out for five hours even though the electrical company had trimmed it on a periodically so there would be not problem.
Tom
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Tom
Good thinking. My mistake!
--
Sincerely,
John A. Keslick, Jr.
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wrote:

I would lime before and after the new topsoil... you may want to consider rototilling that area too. Use the granular lime, it's a few pennies more but it's far less messy. And unless you're absolutely positive of the where the topsoil you're about to purchase came from I'd highly recommend buying topsoil in 40 pound bags from Lowes or Home Depot, it's real topsoil, it's clean, certified chemical free, and when I bought ten bags last week it cost $1.38 each... for a 20 foot diameter plot you probably only need like 20 bags.. will cost you like $30 with tax... I bet much less than just the delivery fee for a load of mystery dirt from some local Super Fund excavation.

The local mix is probably the best choice... you're probably looking to grow a good low maintenence lawn, not a golf green. The local mix will probably best match the rest of your lawn, it would look silly with a 20 foot circle of pure Kentucky blue, like the Martians from War Of the Worlds landed there.
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