Planting for Privacy Screening

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too! From http://davesgarden.com/pf/go/1894/ : ************************************************************************************ On Oct 12, 2003, Thaumaturgist from Rockledge, FL (Zone 10a) wrote:
This is known as Florida Ground Cherry in Florida.
It is so invasive that once it shows up in your yard, total elimination becomes a continuous, monumental but imposible task. ***********************************************************************************
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Ann, gardening in Zone 6a
South of Boston, Massachusetts
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I have had no luck with spearmint in a pot. Our old house had spearmint, and I am familiar with its invasive nature. At our old place, I'd rip out every last bit of spearmint in the fall, and we'd have as much spearmint as I'd ever want the next spring. I still really liked having spearmint nonetheless, and use it for cooking.
I've planted spearmint now in a spot where the soil is very poor, and it is surrounded by concrete on three sides. Nothing wants to grow there, except a very ugly juniper I'd probably rip out if it wasn't the only green thing that has survived on that plot. I've worked in compost every year and even so, there's very little that seems to want to be there long term. This year I stuck spearmint on it, on the theory that it would be more or less contained by the concrete, and nothing else is growing there, anyway.
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Warm Regards,

Claire Petersky
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I didn't know spearmint was such a problem. You and the other posters have convinced me to grow it in a large pot, if at all.
Thanks, SW
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its roots containsed in some fashion
Anthony B.
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Unless you have nothing better to do than pull speariment from other flower beds and from the lawn, take my word for it don't plant it. I spent most of last spring killing off a very large patch that took over the west side of my house. Roundup, and lots of it, is the only way to kill it . Chuckie in the frozen north, zone 5
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It can be a problem, but it isn't always. The previous owners planted mint in a flower bed. Yes, after ten years it is still here but it hasn't taken over my lawn or garden. I simple pull it a couple times a year when I weed. I wouldn't however take any chances if I were you as your results may be different. I also wouldn't put it in a pot and think that you have it cornered. I planted some chocolate mint in one of those planters that straddle your deck railing. It managed to find its way to the ground below. It eventually died without any intervention, probably because the area was too shady. The lesson here it to prevent it from going to seed by sheering off any flowers that develop. I find that plants in the mint family like lemon balm, mint, monarda, and coleus tend to self-seed more successfully than most other plants in my garden.
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height for Green Giant Arborvitae at most nurseries,

is that in years with particularly heavy snow or ice, inner branches can come "loose" out of the hedge and they don't spring back when the warm weather returns, meaning that they have to be pruned out. Many people solve this issue by tying up their arborvitaes in the late fall with twine - however, for a long hedge, that translates into a lot of maintenaince. However, if you are in a region where heavy snow or ice are rare, it might not be an issue.
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Make sure you read up on arborvitae in your state... or talk to your state extension service. There are some real problems with it when certain pests or environmental conditions are common. Make sure you look at arborvitae hedges in your area with your soil conditions and your environmental exposures, so you're not replacing them again later.
Another possibility to consider. A row of similar plants, when one dies or doesn't do well, looks really bad. Even if you replace the dead or dying plant, it still looks funny. A mixed, meandering border doesn't have that problem; nor does it proclaim "property line here" the way a row of something does -- the meander, even though it takes up more room on your property, can suggest that your property is larger than it is, particularly if you can frame a distance view that does not include the neighbor's buildings. <g>
Kay
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In my case, I the privacy fence would give the neighbors privacy for the things they do that I don't want to know about.
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If you took pictures you could probably sell them on your web site.
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Travis in Shoreline Washington


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You haven't seen my neighbors.
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