Planting Daffodil Bulbs

Hi folks,
I'm located in zone 7a and just received a shipment of daffodil bulbs from Park's. I seem to remember reading somewhere that it's important to plant bulbs as soon as possible after receiving them but I'd really like to hold off on planting these for a month or so. So, do you think I'd be safe waiting until the first of November and, if so, how should I store the bulbs until then. I was considering storing them in our dry basement which stays relatively cool.
Thanks for your help, Johnny _____________________ Johnny Johnson Cleveland, GA mailto: snipped-for-privacy@attbi.com
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In the basement should work. It just needs to be cool and dry. It's also good to make sure air can circulate around them so they don't form mildew.
Johnny Johnson wrote:

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On 29 Sep 2005 23:43:34 -0700, "Sonia Van Tassel"

Thanks Sonia and Tom - the bulbs are packed in onion bags and the bags were shipped in a box with perforated sides so I'll just store them "as is" in the basement until I'm ready to plant them.
Later, Johnny _____________________ Johnny Johnson Cleveland, GA mailto: snipped-for-privacy@attbi.com
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As long as you can still work the ground you can plant them. November is fine if you can still dig the soil.
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just another hint, John, whenever I get my bulbs, (I too, live in zone 7a kinda straddling the fence as Mom's Nature does what she pleases in Eastern Tennessee) since I don't want to plant them now either, I store them in the vegetable drawer of the back refridgerator. If you do this, make sure there is NO fruit in the fridge as the ripe fruit will kill the blossom embryo in the bulbs. I do this to give the bulbs the proper chill before I plug them into the ground.
Another note, open that box right now and make sure all the bulbs are without mold or fungus (Park has excellent bulbs). If you do store them in your basement, make sure it's not only cool and dry but that you kind of check the contents to make sure they don't start molding. and to make sure the little mice that are starting to come back inside with the cooler nights haven't discovered your buffet for them! lol
Don't wait too late, though, as the bulbs really need time to grow their roots before cold sets in and they go dormant. You don't need to give them bulb food as the bulb is complete with all that it needs, but you can purchase a few bags of the bulb granular food at the end of the season when they start making room for it with other things and sprinkle some on the bulbs as they emerge next spring. Hope this helps. (by the way, for a lark, you could take one of each kind of bulb and force them for winter display if you're ambitious. Just grab an old nursery pot and fill it half way with soil-less mix, put the bulbs securely in the mix, topdress to an inch of the top, and water thorougly. Then put those pots in the cool basement, and topping with a piece of cardboard on the top of the pots. Check the pots on occaison to make sure the pots aren't totally bone dry, just enough of a dribble to keep the bulbs from stressing and breaking dormancy. Then start watering after New Year's Day a little bit and move to a warmer spot with a little bit of sunlight. When you see "noses" poking out, take some of that granulated bulb food and sprinkle on top of the soil, water a teeny bit more, and move into the sunny room of your choice and wait for the bulb to do it's thing. If you have a really sunny spot, make sure you turn the pots halfway around to get the plants and bulb shoot to grow straight. It will otherwise lean towards the sun. Don't soggy the soil, and try not to put it in the warmest room of the house. Comfortable like you are is fine. You'll be able to enjoy a preview of what's planted in your garden's outside.
Once the bulbs have done their thing, let the leaves completely die back normally. Water on occaison and put outside when the frost has ended. You can plug the whole thing into a spot in your gardens and next year, they'll surprise you and come up when they're supposed to, but make sure you mark the spot and sprinkle a couple of tablespoon's of granulated bulb food on top in the early fall to feed the bulbs more.
good luck! madgardener up on the ridge, on a perfect ending September day, overlooking English Mountain in Eastern Tennessee, zone 7, Sunset zone 36
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