Planter design for shallow rooted plants

I'm considering making some "sculptural" planters out of hypertufa, Hypertufa is concrete mixed with sphagnum moss and either vermiculite or perlite. This makes a somewhat lightweight porous container.
For my purposes of design and ease of construction shallow containers is what I would like.
I found this nice list:
http://www.clallam.net/hhs/documents/eh_goodplants.pdf
I suppose some succulents and mosses could be added to that list.
I'm over in 7A, piedmont.
How shallow can I get away with? Hens and Chicks seems like a good shallow candidate.
I'd like to plant these and attempt to sell a few. What can I grow and reproduce quickly, I know a small bit about cloning.
Any potting suggestions appreciated.
--
pentapus

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
pentapus wrote:

The problem with small and shallow, and small shallow pots is they dry out quickly. So plants that like to be moist (mosses) need to be watered frequently.
Secondly you seem to be mixing plants of differing water requirement. If you combine those that like it damp with those that like it dry there is no good watering regime. Stick to one or the other.
Thirdly mixing in sphagnum to reduce weight doesn't seem like such a good idea to me. Eventually it will rot. How about synthetic beads instead. Vermilculite or perlite should be OK.
--
David

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 7/20/2014 6:46 PM, David Hare-Scott wrote:

<snip>

Succulents then. A huge assortment to choose from: http://www.succulent-plant.com/thumbnails.html
in a dish 5 or 10cm deep but fairly wide
Something short that spreads easily. I'm overwhelmed by the choices, any suggestions?

Hypertufa has been around for a while, I just stumbled on it. Here is Martha Stewart, of all people:
http://www.marthastewart.com/268962/hypertufa-pots
The idea behind the aggregates used is to give it texture and porosity.

--
pentapus

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 21/07/2014 10:38 AM, pentapus wrote:

If Martha says that, she got it wrong. It's all about the texture.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 21/07/2014 8:46 AM, David Hare-Scott wrote:

(snip)

Hypertufa always uses some natural material as part of the recipe - traditionally it's been peat but also coconut fibre has been another common ingredient used instead of peat.
Usually they are made in a rectangle shape so that they have a similar shape to aged animal watering troughs.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 7/21/2014 4:33 AM, Fran Farmer wrote:

Thanks, I'll try it. Seems like it would be a good look. I like that it isn't peat.
I haven't made anything out of hypertufa yet. I have been working on a friend's project, 5' tall cement planters that she inherited from a deceased famous artist (Mr Imagination).
I knew nothing about cement and she apparently picked up nothing while watching him work. We've gone through 5 completely different concrete mixes trying to figure it out when I stumbled on this:
http://www.artistic-garden.com/making-tall-and-impressive-garden-art-sculptures/
http://www.littleandlewis.com

I'm not a follower of the usual.
My Alien Sea Planter:
http://earlymorningreport.com/images/penelope.JPG
I'd like to try something smaller and decidedly more terrestrial with the hypertufa. I'd like it to be functional which is why I'm here.

--
pentapus

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.