Plant thief!

Page 1 of 3  
I bought 4 nice Gerber Daisies to plant around the ugly street sign in my front yard - yellow, white, pink and orange.
A week later, the orange Gerber plant was gone and only the hole in the ground was left. I can't imagine what happened to it. Would an animal run off with a plant like that? I'm thinking someone wanted the orange daisy and just absconded with it. :(
I should have put it in the back yard, but who thought I'd have a problem like that?! Now I'm wondering about the Hydrangeas I'm planning for my front beds. Will they be safe? I know - it probably won't happen again and I'm being paranoid.
Any one else have a problem with plants that grow legs and walk away?
Genevieve zone 9
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Be paranoid.
Plant theft is becoming an all too frequent occurrence. There are some out there who wouldn't give stealing plants a second thought.
There are even reports of commercial nurseries being robbed of plants. Some nurseries that used to allow customers to roam freely among their stock plants will no longer do so unless they are closely chaperoned by staff.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
One day my neighbours shoo'd away two little girls picking flowers from one of my front flower beds. Little wenches.
Lisa

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

well, i'll do my part to remedy this by planting things in random places that are not on my property. i accidentally bought a shade loving phlox when i actually needed something for a sunny spot. maybe i'll put it across the street near the mailboxes instead.
any suggestions for the median strip of the highway near work?
-kelly
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/29/04 4:54 AM, in article c6qfso$f0unk$ snipped-for-privacy@ID-58739.news.uni-berlin.de,

Cheryl
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It's a nice idea to plant in public places for everyone to enjoy but there are sometimes drawbacks. For example, certain plants might be unwelcome around childrens play areas or within reach of animal grazing land, and sometimes it's more important for drivers to have a clear view, or for pedestrians to have a safe refuge, than it is to look pretty.
I've found that snowdrops and daffodils work well; that was in an area where the long roadside verges were tractor-trimmed every summer for safety reasons, so anything summer flowering would have been pointless. There's just one more downside, which was that quite often, drivers would stop,leap out and pick some flowers. There were so many flowers, it wasn't so much the picking that mattered as the fact they had stopped the vehicle on a very dangerous narrow bend above a deep unprotected drop :-(. So be careful where you place temptation.
Janet.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Daffodils spread, and stay for years. Another non-native plant to keep to your own gardens.
If you must, try lily-of-the-valley, or periwinkles (Vinca) or wood lilies, or trout lilies, or whatever is NATIVE where you are.
-
theoneflasehaddock
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
from snipped-for-privacy@aol.comfuckoff (theoneflasehaddock) contains these words:

Load of cod, haddock.

None of those is native here.
Wild narcissus (narcissus pseudonarcissus), which is the one I planted, is native here. Snowdrops arrived in Britain about 2000 years ago; while they are not strictly native, they are widely naturalised.
Janet
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thistle!!

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If it's a native thistle, I second this. Teasel and bull-thistle will do great on disturbed land near a highway.
-
theoneflasehaddock
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Spanish dagger, prickly cactus, twisted leaf yucca, agaves, anything that's sharp.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Please don't do this. Invasive plants are a problem. If you must do this - pick something that's native, please.
No need to spread introduced plants pointlessly.
-
theoneflasehaddock
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

well, i was partially joking...
but i do have a native wildflower mix that might be nice. they're all pretty fragile, i doubt they'd become a problem.
it's not like i'm planning on planting english ivy or something. ;-)
-kelly
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com says... <I bought 4 nice Gerber Daisies to plant around the ugly street sign in <my front yard - yellow, white, pink and orange. < <A week later, the orange Gerber plant was gone and only the hole in <the ground was left. I can't imagine what happened to it. Would an <animal run off with a plant like that? I'm thinking someone wanted the <orange daisy and just absconded with it. :( < <I should have put it in the back yard, but who thought I'd have a <problem like that?! Now I'm wondering about the Hydrangeas I'm <planning for my front beds. Will they be safe? I know - it probably <won't happen again and I'm being paranoid. < <Any one else have a problem with plants that grow legs and walk away? < <Genevieve <zone 9 <
http://abclocal.go.com/wls/news/strange/042704_ap_sn_palmtrees.html
        Bill
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

i hate to say this, but evil nurserymen have been stealing saguaro cacti for more than 30 years!! they dig up young babies and take them back to their city floral shops and/or nurseries and sell them for HOUSE PLANTS!
and then, too, are the ever wise folk of phoenix, arizona who decided to turn phoenix into an agricultural wonderland and proceeded to put in irrigation canals which aid in adding humidity to a land which is supposed to be arid and they, too, have aided in the "stealing" of saguaro and other cacti by killing the native climate. saguaro and other cacti need aridity; too much humidity causes their death.
gee, arizona may have to change their state tree from the saguaro to russian olives before much longer. (sigh) another wonderful mechanical disease. we can add this to the list with kudzu and water hyacinths.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Not true, bluenose.
Nurserymen need to get permission to dig up Cactaceae in Arizona. Nowadays, they are rescue missions to relocate the plants before the valuable succulents are plowed under by disinterested land developers. Blame it on suburban sprawl by people who have no reason to live in the desert, land speculators and greedy politicians not the nurserymen.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
We used to call the theft of plants from newly planted beds "Finger blight". Mostly the people who steal plants are not those who cant afford to buy plants, though there have been several instances in this part of Wales of people waking up in the morning to find that their New hedge has gone walk about, though there was one case of a 2yr old hedge around 60 ft long that went in one night, and the ground was levelled out where it had been.
David Hill Abacus nurseries www.abacus-nurseries.co.uk
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Technically, the property around a street sign is public property. I dont know if taking a plant from public lands would be considered stealing.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
chaz wrote:

If the sign is simply in an easement, then it's still private property. But if it is publicly owned land, it is still stealing, only the victim is now the public entity that owns the land.
Central Park is public land, but if you tried to take a park bench, you'd obviously be stealing. Just because something is on public land doesn't mean it's there for the public to take.
--
Warren H.

==========
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
When you notice someone clipping something desireable, hang around and ask if taking 2 or 3 clips is OK. Even a day or so later you may find usable little snips on the sidewalk or the street. zemedelec
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.