Plant identification, wild

hi all,
I live in Maryland, Z7. My husband and I saw a shrub, wild, in our back yard that is lovely. We collected some seeds and then started seeing them everyhwere. I do not have a digital camera so I can only describe them to the best of my ability.
They are yellow with orange flecks, shaped a bit like standard orchids bred with pitcher plants at a minute size. They are approximately .5" in length and have a tail. The shrub grows in great round clumps, about 4 feet high and 4 feet in width. The most interesting thing about them is that the fruit they produce is about .5" in lenght adn are colored a bit ike a watermelon without the light yellow, and they "explode" when touched. The pod is striated, and the individual parts peel back like a banana but curl under. The seeds are small and brown.
They grow wild in the northern/central part of maryland.
Anyone have a clue as to what they are?
Thanks in advance, Trai
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On Fri, 3 Oct 2003 00:00:54 -0400, "Matt & Trai Rathsack"

http://www.botany.com/impatiens.html
sound like these?
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- Charles
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wrote:

THOSE ARE THE ONES! Thanks!! We love them, but I think they are weeds. or weedy...at any rate they are very pretty aren't they?
trai
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Jewelweed or Touch me not Impatiens capensis
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (MLEBLANCA) wrote:

Yep. If you have stinging nettle, rubbing a leaf from jewelweed on the sting will make it stop stinging. The plants usually grow near each other.
Jan
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writes:

rubbed. Warning about these plants - they are highly invasive and you will likely curse the day you brought them into your yard!!! Take it from one who also thought they were very pretty flowers once. Now every spring I am still pulling out thousands of little jewelweed seedlings!! A few always manage to go unnoticed growing among other plants. And they will grow anywhere even in the darkest spots in your garden. Tina
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writes:

wild in the back, next to the park our property runs adjacent to. interesting. What is the chemicla in the leaf that breaks down the poisons?
trai
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writes:

attention - I may just google it though. There is lots on the net about it. Apparently work good on insect bites as well - wasps, bees, other 'hurting kind'. But just about any crushed plant will do as well. I'm guessing some kind of flavenoid..
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(snip of increasingly long previous post...)

Well, maybe I'll email a botonist on that one. Very interesting. I might just have to go out and get stung to find out if it works...hopefully I won't develop a deadly allergy suddenly to bees....but it would be interesting to find out if different plants do indeed stop the sting. Do the crushed leaves need to be wetted with anything?
trai
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There are indeed many wild plants that contain chemicals that help us heal......and take away pain, willow bark is the prime example.. Tina
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"........... Apparently work good on insect bites as well - wasps, bees, other 'hurting kind'. But just about any crushed plant will do as well. I'm guessing some kind of flavenoid........."
Well in the UK it's Dock leaves for nettle stings, also you can use Sorrel, Which is actually better as it has more sap in the leaves. The sap from the leaves contain an anti histamine so act on the sting chemicaly, also the coolness of the crushed leaf is also soothing.
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David Hill
Abacus nurseries
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"Matt & Trai Rathsack"

Interesting Jan, because we do indeed have stinging nettles. My daughter hopped on one last year and told me "fireant plants' had bitten her...lol.
That's a great peice of advice, thanks! Trai
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