Plant Identification?

Found this beauty in the woods, it stays green all winter (east TN)and it goes down in the 20's and teens a lot with this staying green. Last fall I had dug up one (I didn't dig it up until I saw I had more of them in the woods close by.) I thought the one now in captivity was doing well until today I took a walk in the woods to see how the others are. Seems like the leaves on the captive one are severely stunted! Otherwise looks healthy and getting ready to bloom. I am going to plant it in the garden, I just didn't find the right spot yet. Looks like it needs filtered light. Does well with some direct sunlight but not too much. Here is a link to some pics:
https://picasaweb.google.com/tony.miklos/UnknownPlant02?authkey=Gv1sRgCN_5l4zH-4CrrAE&feat=directlink
Hmm, I used to be able to post links without them being broken so I guess you will have to cut and paste it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/15/11 5:53 PM, Tony Miklos wrote:

https://picasaweb.google.com/tony.miklos/UnknownPlant02?authkey=Gv1sRgCN_5l4zH-4CrrAE&feat=directlink
Although they appear different, both the woodland and potted plants appear to be a form of Geranium. These would be "true" Geraniums and not Pelargoniums, which are commonly called "geraniums".
On the other hand, they might indeed be Pelargonium tomentosum (t geranium).
--
David E. Ross
Climate: California Mediterranean
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/15/2011 10:41 PM, David E. Ross wrote:

Yes, I believe they are the same or related, they are all in one 200sq' area in the woods, the potted one with rounded leaves was right there with the rest of the "pointy leaf" ones. The coloring and variegation on the leaves are identical, and so far the flower "spikes" are identical. Now that the pointy leaf kind is multiplying in the woods, I'll surely add one of those to the garden also. I won't did up anything that may be the only one around.

I don't think it's the tomentosum, there is no mint like smell, but I see the Pelargoniums in general, some have pointy and some have round leaves. Could be it. I'm anticipating the flowers to compare them. Still, the variegation of the leaves on mine is 100 times more beautiful then any I saw pics of or have seen in person.
I hope I don't find out someone threw an ailing potted geranium in the woods and that's what I have! Although the foliage is so pretty, it doesn't matter what it turns out to be.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Tony Miklos said:

authkey=Gv1sRgCN_5l4zH-4CrrAE&feat=directlink
That's a Heuchera, AKA alum root, possibly H. americana. The leaf color and shape is naturally quite variable, which has allowed for many domestic cultivars to be derived from an already attractive wild plant.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heuchera_americana http://www.wildflower.org/plants/result.php?id_plant=HEAM6
--
Pat in Plymouth MI

"Yes. Swooping is bad."
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Hi Pat I knew this one would get a reply from Pat! How are you, we actually have a sunny day... I looked at the photos last nite and it was too late to do searches so I had just settled on Saxifrage Family so far. I agree it should be a Heuchera. The pointy foliage one almost looks like a Heucherella. Do those hybrids occur in the wild, do you know?
Beautiful variations in foliage of Heuchera now, YES. and I have about 15 or so of them! and about 4 Heucherella, and a couple Tiarella. Do you think I like them or what?
Hi Tony Beautiful plant. I think the tall flower stalk with its fat buds pretty much rules out the Geranium Family. Let us know what it is like in bloom. I have the western version of Alum Root, H. micrantha, and also another CA native H. maxima. Both blooming right now.
Emilie Nor CAL
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
mleblanca said:

Well, I planted my peas last week, and of course, it is snowing this morning.
We've had only one really warm day (the Sunday before I planted the peas) and only a few not-cold, dry days for yard work so I am far behind.

I wouldn't be surprised if that could happen, but Heuchera are certainly capable of extreme variation all on their own.

Every year it seem you see a stunning new one in the nurseries, but the emphasis has been all on foliage.
There were a few older cultivars selected for the flowers. I'd like to see them breed blazing coral-colored blooms back into some of the new types.
--
Pat in Plymouth MI

"Yes. Swooping is bad."
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Tony Miklos wrote:

Why didn't you plant it in an old soup tin? Poor thing is struggling in that silly tiny plastic pot... don't you own a piece of ground... at least plant it in an unglazed clay pot 4-6 times that size. Unless you can afford a piece of ground or a proper container then leave plants where they live. I truly hope you don't have any pets, you'd abuse them too.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/16/2011 9:06 AM, Brooklyn1 wrote:

Don't get your panties in a wad, it will get planted when some other landscaping is ready for it. Besides, it was the worst looking one in the woods and now it looks a lot healthier than it was. It was up high on a fallen tree stump with the earth around it washing away each time it rained. I saved it from a certain dry death. Now where did I put that soup tin...... I'll take your advice.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Apr 16, 6:06am, Brooklyn1 <Gravesend1> wrote:

Oh Brookie, you are so funny; you really make me laugh! How do you know Tony's plans for this plant? He may have a 10 acre wildflower estate Are you a mentalist, a mind reader, clairvoyant, huh Emilie
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 4/16/2011 1:18 PM, mleblanca wrote:

No, only 5 acres mostly wooded, I wish I could do something good with wildflowers but it's not easy. So far my best wildflower luck is with daisies. If when they start blooming I water them often, they bloom for months! I don't know what it is, but I can't even grow chicory! I've collected hundreds of seeds and just can't get them to grow. So when I'm getting the mail, I walk along the road to see the chicory blooming beautifully in the gutter. Maybe if I throw rock salt on the seeds when it snows, drive on it now and then, spit a little oil and gas on them, throw cigarette butts on them, then they will grow? And of course I have plans for that plant, I just can't decide where to put it.... seems like it likes filtered light or some direct sun but not too much.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Tony Miklos wrote: ...

i can't say for sure, because all the roadsides here have it and the environment is mixed (some full sun and some shaded). i think actually the key is that it needs disturbed soil to get established and would get crowded out if left alone (not mowed regularly like a roadside).
we've got chicory growing here in a sandy spot (one of the few we've got in the yard). it gets full sun at mid day and is shaded later in the day.
i transplanted a few small plants from along side of the road. dug as much of the root as i could. watered it a bit until i saw new growth. i think the key is that i chose the smallest plants i could find.
they are surrounded by wood chips and other plantings and we always have plenty of volunteers to weed.
the bunnies, deer and goldfinches like it.
songbird
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 16 Apr 2011 19:40:20 -0400, Tony Miklos

I feel your pain with chicory. I'm in middle TN and it seems to grow right up to the property line and until last year would not cross it. I, too, tried seeds, transplanting - nothing. Then last year it finally ventured to a spot and had a couple of blooms. I hoping it will decide to like it here.
Kate
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.