Plant ID help

I still have a batch of pictures from a years ago Wildman Steve Brill foraging walk that I have not yet put on the web. This means this batch is not yet merged into my http://foragingpictures.com/ album. Before I can process them there are four pictures I need to identify. They are shown at:
http://donwiss.com/PP-20060701.htm
What are they?
Don <www.donwiss.com> (e-mail link at home page bottom).
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#4 may be Hibiscus
http://images.google.com/images?q=Hibiscus&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8
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Bill Garden in shade zone 5 S Jersey USA
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On 3/25/10 12:46 PM, Don Wiss wrote:

If #4 is not a hibiscus, it is still a mallow. Mallows include hibiscus, blue hibiscus, okra, Lavatera, and hollyhock.
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David E. Ross
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Not Lavatera; not hollyhock, both of which have filiform stigmas (and more than 5 style arms). Not Alygoyne (blue hibiscus) (wrong colour). It would be something in tribe Hibisceae, and probably not one of the schizocarpic fruited genera (e.g. Malvaviscus, Pavonia), which have 10 style arms. Not Abelmoschus (okra) (foliage wrong).
It doesn't look that far off Hibiscus rosa-sinensis (leaf shape and androecial structure seem to match).
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Stewart Robert Hinsley

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David E. Ross wrote:

To my inexpert eye it looks like a hibiscus. I am guessing that there are several plants around the world locally called hibiscus. Which "hibiscus" is it not and why not?
David
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"Don Wiss" wrote

#1 is debatable. Possibly early season Lavander? Thyme also comes to mind as does early season wild fennel.
#2 Flowering Mustard is what it looks like. There's an Asian version that looks just like that. Grows in the USA as well.
#3 Could that be slippery Elm?
#4 version of hibiscis
If it helps, I believe all those are edibles except it's the bark of the slippery elm.
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Don Wiss said:

is
can
at:
#1 is not lavendar or thyme, and probably not fennel, either. Though it does look familiar...I know I've seen this before...
#2 Is not a mustard.
It does somewhat suggest pokeweed just starting to show flower buds, but I've no real confidence in that ID. I have no real sense of scale on it.
<http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Wikijunior:Summer_Flowers_of_Northern_ New_England/Phytolacca_americana>
#3 Is not slippery elm. Of that much I'm certain.
#4 does look to be some cultiver of Hibiscus rosa-sinensis.
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Pat in Plymouth MI

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I agree with you Pat. It is something that we should know and not lavender or thyme or fennel.

Also agree, the first thing I thought was Poke with buds. The leaves are very like Poke weed too.

Agreed. Another one that looks familiar

Yes it is...also known as Chinese Hibiscus or Tropical Hibiscus.

Emilie NorCal
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Don It might help to know where you saw these plants: country, state etc.
Emilie
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Yea, I should have made that clearer. Wildman Steve Brill only gives tours in the NYC area. These are from Prospect Park. And the date is in the URL, which means these were taken on July 1st.
The last picture wasn't on his tour. So it would be whatever Hibiscus grows around here.
Don <www.donwiss.com> (e-mail link at home page bottom).
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On 3/27/10 12:48 PM, Don Wiss wrote:

No variety of Hibiscus rosa-sinensis (a tropical) will survive a New York winter. Even with light night-time frosts where I live, they are marginal. However, some varieties grow and flower quickly and can be used as annuals.
Hibiscus syriacus (rose of Sharon) is hardy to -10F when mature, but I can't find a yellow variety. Hibiscus mutabilis (confederate rose) is hardy to 28F, but it too does not seem to have a yellow variety.
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Don Wiss said:

batch is

can
at:
Perhaps if you repost the images around that time it will help (especially with #1).
I think that the pokeweed and Hibiscus IDs are reliable.
The first one hasn't been IDed properly yet, and the other one with pinnately compound leaves is that is not slippery elm (and not a sumac, either, in my opinion) remained to be IDed.
I'm thinking that one is not a woody plant at all, but rather an herb. Possibly even something like tickseed sunflower -- a common name for several species of large Bidens -- too bad we have no sign of flowers or even buds. (But this is a rather wild guess...)
Were these plants all supposed to be edible or in some other way useful?
--
Pat in Plymouth MI

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Yes. You can see a pokeweed in the same park at about the same time here: http://foragingpictures.com/plants/Pokeweed/h0010.htm

I thought the first one was one of the mustard family. Now I have taken many pictures of his tours in Prospect Park. There is no plant here that he hasn't pointed out on one of his prior tours and is already in foragingpictures.com. The Hibiscus I just took on my own, as it was a pretty flower.

Tickseed sunflower or large Bidens have never been pointed out on a tour of his.

Yes, or poisonous and he's pointing them out to avoid them. Like he loves to hold white snakeroot and give the story of Lincoln's mother dying of milk from a cow that ate the plant. And why people had to fence their pastures to keep the cows out of the woods.
Don <www.donwiss.com> (e-mail link at home page bottom).
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Don Wiss said:

For the first one, I had the sudden thought last night of Artemisia dracunculus (tarragon).
If we are thinking mustards, though, maybe Lepidium (peppergrass). So, L. virginicum or L. ruderale...?
And how about another guess--Erigeron canadensis (horseweed). They all have something of that green plumey effect with flowers buds that start out small and insignificant.
--
Pat in Plymouth MI

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In article

Looks too branched and busy to me to be tarragon.
http://farm-wild-fresh.com/images/tarragon.jpg

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Right, Pat. It isn't sumac/Rhus, not enough leaflets, only 5. Sumac has at least 9 leaflets.

Looking at the leaves in the lower right hand corner, they look rather mustard-like, but without flowers and/or seeds it is difficult to be sure. They look rather "cress-like". Do you remember any flowers, Don? color, # of petals?
Emilie

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Pat Kiewicz[_2_];881594']Don Wiss said:-
On Fri, 26 Mar 2010, mleblanca snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote: - On Mar 25, 1:46 pm, Don Wiss wrote:- I still have a batch of pictures from a years ago Wildman Steve Brill foraging walk that I have not yet put on the web. This means this --- batch is--- not yet merged into myhttp://foragingpictures.com/album . Before I --- can--- process them there are four pictures I need to identify. They are shown
--
at:---

http://donwiss.com/PP-20060701.htm
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Don Wiss wrote:

#1 Wild carrot/daucus carota/Queen Anne's lace?
#3 looks like some kind of Rhus/sumac
gloria p
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