Pine Tree Question

Hi everyone - I am planning on putting in a brick patio in my backyard and would like to put it next to a large pine tree (50 feet tall). My question is this - wince I need to dig down 6 - 8 inches to lay the foundational aggregate and the resulting brick patio literally right next to the tree, will I cause any permanent damage to the tree (or even kill it), by removing any roots within those 6 - 8"?
Thanks!
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Yes, you will cause damage to the tree. Worse case scenario would be die back from either missing roots, or from a pathogen interring the tree from the root damage. Typically, die back could occur within 5 years after such types of construction, you get past that period of time, and you should be alright.
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I agree with Don Staples. Oaks in my area take 5 years at least for healthy ones to start with. Tulip poplar trees forget it they are a goner. I dug out my parents turf around a J. maple and placed fresh chips down and it took over 13 years for the tree to stop producing leaves. I will place a cross section under scope and see when decline started. Any way I agree with Don. Pines in southern Louisiana took 9 years. We were doing an autopsy on pines that became symplastless and bark beetles were present. It turned out when we took a closer look that the decline started 9 years before our autopsy and that was when the drive way was put in. So the bark beetles were secondary agents and not the cause. It took at least 8 years for the trees to become symplastless and stop producing needles. They were healthy until the drive way went in. It was kind of interesting because at that time I offered $200.00 to anyone who could provide a sample that showed that bark beetles were the primary cause of a tree becoming symplastless. For those who would like to know what I mean when I say symplastless: http://www.treedictionary.com/DICT2003/S/symplastless.html
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John A. Keslick, Jr.
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Even if it doesn't damage the tree, the tree roots will likely damage your patio. Ever see what happens when you plant a tree right next to a sidewalk? Where I live, some genious came along and planted these big trees along the sidewalks (or maybe the put the sidewalk next to the trees?) and now the sidewalks are so badly buckled, they are dangerous to walk on.
Removing the roots won't stop this, they grow back. I would not put any type of cement or brick work next a tree.

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On Fri, 7 Mar 2008 09:56:40 -0800 (PST),

Possibly. To keep a tree healthy, best to leave it alone.
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In article

It's russian roulette. I've seen profound damage done to tree roots -- builders taking out ALL the roots on one side of a whole row of trees -- and the trees never showed no sign of noticing. Yet I know of people who didn't hurt a tree's roots at all but managed to kill a tree by building a raised bed over shallow roots that didn't like finding themselves deeper.
In any case it'll take three or four years to know if you've doomed a tree, not apt to quickly reveal if it's hurt or okay. In the meantime, pines and firs can be very prone to blow-down when roots weaken even if the tree looks healthy. So you might want to assess which way the winds usually blow and if it's more apt to fall on your roof or the neighbor's.
You might look at the layout you're planning and see if there isn't an attractive way to have a wood "step up" part of the patio then you could build a little raised wooden walkway around the tree not even touching the ground over shallow roots.
-paghat the ratgirl
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On Mar 7, 4:47 pm, snipped-for-privacy@paghat.com (paghat) wrote:

That's not a bad idea actually - thanks! I have a follow up question to my original post however. How far should I be from the tree in order to reduce the damage? Should I go out to at least the drip line? I really wanted to have some portion of the patio under the tree because it is the only shade I have in this area.
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On Mar 7, 6:48 pm, " snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com"

I just did some Google-ing and I think I found my answer from the link http://www.ianrpubs.unl.edu/epublic/pages/publicationD.jsp?publicationId "6
"A brick or patio walkway that uses a sand base and a geotextile underlay allow oxygen and water to penetrate into the soil below (Figure 5). Sidewalks that must pass within the PRZ should be located a minimum of 3 feet away from the tree trunk. Raised wood decks are an excellent alternative to concrete patios because tree root disruption is minimized."
So 3 feet appears to be the proper distance (at a minimum). Anyone out there disagree?
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In article

You really don't want any compaction between the trunk and the drip line. Stick with the deck.
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Billy

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compacting the soil. Compacting the soil of pine is a serious problem.
Should I go out to at least the drip

YES
I really wanted to have some portion of the patio under the

If the symplast dies from compaction or removal on non-woody roots you will not have shade for long.
Why not raise the patio? Contact me to discuss if interested. 610-864-5251 If not, ok then.
--
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John A. Keslick, Jr.
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Very good question!!!!!!
YES!!!!!!!
Most of you non-woody roots are in the upper 4 inches of soil most of the time. many woody roots can be in upper 9".
#1 See - Troubles in the Rhizosphere for starters http://www.treedictionary.com/DICT2003/shigo/RHIZO.html
#2 See Roots: http://www.treedictionary.com/DICT2003/R/roots.html
-- Sincerely, John A. Keslick, Jr. Consulting Forester & Tree Expert http://home.ccil.org/~treeman and www.treedictionary.com Beware of so-called tree experts who do not understand tree biology. Storms, fires, floods, earthquakes, and volcanic eruptions keep reminding us that we are not the boss.
See Troubles in the Rhizo
face=Arial size=2>...</FONT></DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2>&gt; Hi everyone - I am planning on putting in a brick patio in my backyard<BR>&gt; and would like to put it next to a large pine tree (50 feet tall).&nbsp; My<BR>&gt; question is this - wince I need to dig down 6 - 8 inches to lay the<BR>&gt; foundational aggregate and the resulting brick patio literally right<BR>&gt; next to the tree, will I cause any permanent damage to the tree (or<BR>&gt; even kill it), by removing any roots within those 6 - 8"?<BR>&gt; <BR>&gt; Thanks!</FONT></BODY></HTML> ------=
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