PHOTO OF THE WEEK, Turnip Mystery

Turnips like this one can be had in most grocery stores year round.
So why did we select it as a Photo of the Week?
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PHOTO OF THE WEEK: http://schmidling.com/pow.htm Astronomy, Beer, Cheese, Fiber,Gems, Sausage,Silver http://schmidling.com
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snipped-for-privacy@schmidling.com wrote:

Looks like a mineral deficiency. If the tiny bit of minerals in a peat pot can make a difference, I'll guess it's either a boron deficiency, or maybe iron (iron bound up in alkaline soil except where the acid peat maybe releases it.)
These are wild-ass guesses. It'll be interesting to see what other theories folks have.
Best regards, Bob
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It is a possibility. the OP should give it a try and put down a healthy layer of manure this winter (that would adjust both the deficiency and the pH). Is the soil clay? If so, the peat can provide early growing room. But more important, I have had a number of situations with greens (like tatsoi, chard, beet, cardoon, some cabbages and bok choi) where they stalled and remained miserable. The causes I came up with (I have sandy loam) were too little watering in the early going, too little manure (humus and nitrogen) and too early/too late planting. These little plants are fairly heavy feeders after all. Then there are bug cycles. It looks like the miserable one ran into a generation or two of caterpillars. If they get clipped when they are young, they will never develop properly.
Right now I have two one foot sqaure patches of broccoli rabe. They are separated by two feet, same bed, soil, and watering. One is three times the size of the other, which is next to a stand of lemon balm. It could be a bad companion, or it could be rodent tunnels underneath.
Single fixes do not often work in a garden. Systematic trials starting from optimal conditions (late summer planting in Jiffy pots, high water and manure) should allow the OP to find out how much he can get away with. Hey, it takes five years to figure out how to manage a particular garden.
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What a nice site. I saw the bluebird page. Just a few words OT to say that there are many bird houses for bluebirds along roads here in the countryside in Shenandoah, VA. We learned that if a nest is not cleaned out thoroughly that they will not raise a new family in it. We keep track (but not disturb them) of when the birds leave after the first family leaves; my husband cleans thoroughly the nest, and before long another family will come; one or two times, we had three new families in one season. I don't know if you know this or not and if it is one of the reasons. (Another reason my be that another bird -- forget the name -- that is arrogant -- will keep the bluebirds from settling in. We had that happen once. There are several situations that cause this to happen, but I can't remember them. There are remedies. Dee Dee
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