Peach leaf curl

I have two peach trees and both have peach leaf curl. One of the trees has very few leaves and most are affected.
My nursery gave me Growmore Organic Seaweed extract to spray on the leaves. It does not say on the bottle it is designed for this type of application but I have seen reference to its use on nursery sites.
Any feedback?
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On Tue, 12 Apr 2005 14:52:02 +0000, grinder wrote:

Good day, I'm unsure what the seaweed extract will do against a fungal infection. Maybe they have information that I don't. Either way, the tree with the most infection maybe a loss. It really depends the size and age of the tree.
Peach leaf curl: http://pep.wsu.edu/hortsense / Click Tree Fruits> Peach
<begin Copy Paste> Biology Peach leaf curl is a fungal disease affecting primarily the leaves and shoots. Fruit is occasionally attacked. Young leaves develop yellow to reddish discoloration and become thickened, crisp, and crinkled. Affected leaves are curled and deformed. A white powdery coating of the fungus later develops on infected leaves. Infected leaves either turn yellow and drop or remain on the tree, turning dark brown as the season progresses. Infected green shoots become thickened and distorted. Fruits may show swollen, reddish areas on the surface. These areas lack the normal peach fuzz. The fungus overwinters on twigs and buds. This disease is a major problem of peaches in western Washington. Severe leaf drop affects fruit production, reduces vigor of trees, and increases susceptibility to winter injury.
Management Options Select Non-chemical Management Options as Your First Choice!!
* Plant disease-tolerant or resistant varieties. 'Krummel', 'Muir', and 'Redhaven' are reported to be tolerant. 'Rosy Dawn' is somewhat resistant. 'Frost' is disease-resistant and is recommended for planting in western Washington. However, it has no juvenile resistance and must be protected during the first 2 to 3 years. * Remove infected leaves when they first appear prior to sporulation of the fungus. Destroy infected material.
        Revision Date:7/1/2004 Apply a fungicide during the first week of January. Make 2 to 3 additional applications at 3- to 4-week intervals. If weather is cool and wet, apply fungicides at 3-week intervals. If the weather is warm and dry, apply fungicides at 4-week intervals.
* Bonide Fung-onil Multi-Purpose Fungicide R-T-U * Cooke Kop-R-Spray Conc * Dexol Bordeaux Powder * Hi-Yield Bordeaux Mix Fungicide * Hi-Yield Lime Sulfur Spray * Lilly Miller Microcop Fungicide * Lilly Miller Polysul Summer & Dormant Spray Conc * Monterey Liqui-Cop Copper Fungicidal Garden Spray * Ortho Multi-Purpose Fungicide Daconil 2787 Conc * This list may not include all products registered for this use.
</end Copy Paste>
This information is for washington state. The spray times for your area may vary. Good luck.
--
Yard Works Gardening Co.
http://www.ywgc.com
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I seriiously doubt if the prodfuct will aid the peach leaf curl. It is generally accepted that there is nothing you dan do to stop or slow the curl for this year. During the winter dormant season you can spray to prevent curl for the coming season.
I would quickly lose faith in your nursery.
Dick

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wrote:

It's not just my nursery:
http://gis.ucsc.edu/disease/Fungal%20Pathogens/Taphrina/tdeformansportrait.html Kelp-based seaweed products may also be applied as a foliar spray. Naturally occuring hormones present within the seaweed interfere with Taphrina development. Susceptibility to Taphrina may also be linked with a magnesium deficiency, a nutrient present in kelp. In an experiment comparing tree blocks sprayed with copper, lime-sulfur or kelp product, the kelp sprayed trees sustained heavier leaf curl damage but refoliated faster and after several seasons was reduced to levels close to those treated with fungicides. "Maxicrop" is a registered kelp product that is not phytotoxic or toxic residue leaving. Spraying Maxicrop twice a month is most effective (Burkam 1992).
http://www.ghorganics.com/page15.html Peach tree leaf curl: This is a common disease of peach trees. Sprays of horsetail tea, garlic (look further down the page for recipes) and seaweed can help to prevent this problem. Growing chives underneath them also helps.
http://wlapwww.gov.bc.ca/epd/ipm/docs/envirowe/chap13.htm Peach leaf curl Preferred Controls Apply dormant sprays of lime-sulphur or copper just before bud break to kill overwintering spores in bud scales Apply fixed copper sprays in September, after harvest Pick and destroy all affected leaves as soon as symptoms are visible to prevent the fungus from reproducing Spray liquid seaweed extracts at least once a month during the growing season; these have been shown to reduce damage, possibly by providing micronutrients to trees

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grinder Wrote:

wow i have learned somethin there ty very much
in UK they say leaf curl comes with the april rain and if ya protec new foliage until after May ya won t get affected....as if that possible covering trees from the rain.
maxicrop i am a big big fan of...its so expensive here. reminds me on of the very first experiences as a professional gardener was to appl maxicrop out of a big mobile water tank to many many urns in a Roya Park in London...turned out the black stuff i was handed by the ol gimp from the stores was sump oil....but nothing died
-- Eyebright
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