Passiflora incarnata -- are there any others this hardy?

The other day I was walking in a State Park here in Georgia and came across a vine with a delightfully flashy bloom. I looked all over the place to find out what it was and discovered that it was the Passion Flower/Maypop, aka Passiflora incarnata. In scouting some sources, I find that there are a bunch of Passiflora, but all the others I have seen require tropical or semi-tropical climate. I live in zone 6b-7 in the North Georgia mountains.
Are there any other Passion Flowers that can overwinter outdoors in Southern Appalacia?
Thanks!
billo
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Bill Oliver wrote:

Yes. DW grew up not-to-far-south of Chattanooga, just barely in the Appalachians, and says they grew wind there.
Bob
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That's my part of the country!
Just P. incarnata or a different one? The Maypop I saw in the park was wild. I was just curious if anything other than P incarnata would grow up here, or just that one species.
billo
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Bill Oliver wrote:

P. incarnata, or purple passionflower, or maypop. It is a state flower of Tennessee. I would expect you to be able to find it at any garden center there.
I have no idea if any South American tropical varieties will grow there without extensive winter protection.
Bob
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Thanks. The latter was my question. I found one place out of Atlanta that has a website (I haven't ordered anything from them, so this is *not* an endorsement or review or criticism of the site):
http://passionflowerfarms.com
that lists two others:
Passiflora "Incense" -- which looks an awful lot like a regular maypop. Passiflora caerulea "Blue Passion Flower" -- which it says is "root hardy" to zone 6. I assume "root hardy" means that, like the regular maypop, it dies back in the winter and re-emerges in the spring.
billo
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wrote:

Look for P. edulis (the edible passionfruit vine) as well. P. caerulea should work well for you. Here in zone 8 it is mostly an evergreen vine, but in colder climates it will suffer winter dieback. Plant in protected location, preferrably with some reflected heat, to minimize this.
pam - gardengal
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Thanks!
billo
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http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&lr=&ie=UTF-8&q=hardiest+passiflora
edulis may (i'm not sure) survive most winters in san jose area (south bay of san francsico), but frosts out worse farther north. not sure if the yellow varities are any better.
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My P caerulea produced a huge crop of maypops this year, ripening serially in July & August, & they're very tasty. Though seedy, the seeds are soft, & all the bright red pulp can be chewed up seeds & all without having a seedy texture. The rinds I usually just compost as there's just too much of it, but some of it I use the same as one would fry green tomato substututes, or fry in olive oil along with green peppers & onions & basil & black pepper, keeping it in refrigerator (lasts ages) to use as a relish on veggy gardenburgers.
-paghat the ratgirl
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"Of what are you afraid, my child?" inquired the kindly teacher.
"Oh, sir! The flowers, they are wild," replied the timid creature.
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I've ordered from Logees greenhouse quite a few times and have always been happy with the plants they send. I know they have a large selection of passion flowers and they have the 2 selections Pam recommended looking for (P. edulis and P. caerulea )
www.logees.com
Mary
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I'll give them a look. Thanks!
billo
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Check with the Georgia Native Plant Society and find out about all species that grow in Georgia. http://www.gnps.org /
J. Kolenovsky
Bill Oliver wrote:

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Celestial Habitats by J. Kolenovsky
2003 Honorable Mention Award, Keep Houston Beautiful
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http://plants.usda.gov/cgi_bin/plant_profile.cgi?symbol=PASSI
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