OT RANT: Woodchuck Plague Even Worse Than Usual

The east side property line is a paradise for woodchucks -- which are called groundhogs here -- because it is defined by a line of about 50 mulberry and black cherry trees. There's also a barbed wire fence.
The 'hogs are smart enough to excavate connecting burrows on either side of the fence. This eliminates the use of smoke bombs because you need access to clog-up each hole. That's hard to do with a barbed wire fence. Those battery-powered noisemaking stakes don't work either. Instead of being driven away by the noise, the 'hogs attack and destroy them. The best solution the past 32 years has been a 12 gauge shotgun, but 'hogs ain't easy to hunt. They are wary, and enjoy excellent eyesight, hearing, and olfaction.
Had a guest who suffered a sprained ankle by inadvertently stepping into a hole. On another occasion a tractor wheel got stuck and it was hell trying to free it. Last year a 'hog ignored the vacant burrows along the east side and started a new one under the house foundation. But the worst problem are the piles of dirt and rocks outside the burrows. You have two options on mowing day: rake the debris back into the hole, or carefully mow around the piles. The second option is better because if you continually rake the debris back into the hole, the 'hog gets pissed-off and starts a new hole. Don't need any new burrows.
On the bright side, I wounded one today, looked like a big alpha male. A wound is as good as an outright kill because the infection will finish him shortly. But the news spread fast. Not a half hour later, a smaller one scampered along the row apparently to claim the more desirable burrow where the big guy lived and which features both a white and black mulberry tree within a few feet of it.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Jun 20, 8:48 am, snipped-for-privacy@Home.org (Jack) wrote:

Get a bunch of Giant Destroyer bombs, dump in hole and cover them up, but not if your home or a neighbor is downwind. I used them in my basement and cleaned out everything living, even myself.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Jun 20, 9:48 am, snipped-for-privacy@Home.org (Jack) wrote:

The Sister-in-law tends to soak slices of cantaloupe with antifreeze and drop some in the groundhog holes when they get to be too much.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Jack wrote:

I remember seeing a story of a fellow modifying a parking lot vacuum cleaner truck with a large diameter hose to pull prairie dogs out of their burrows. I'm sure something like that would do the same for woodchucks.
http://tinyurl.com/muej9s
TDD
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Jack wrote:

You have a woodchuck population only because you have all those mulberry and cherry trees, they play a major part of their food supply. Even if you do away with some woodchucks new ones will arrive so long as those trees are there. You cannot have those trees if you don't want those woodchucks. The only reasonable solution is to make that area a woodchuck sanctuary, pile in lots of big rocks and build lots brush piles under all those trees... the woodchucks will be happy, you won't need to mow there, and the woodchucks will not encroach to where there is no food supply. I have some woodchucks but they stay near the brush piles I made way out in my woods alongside some old rock walls... wood chucks like to burrow under large rocks. Of course I don't have 50 fruit trees there either. Your fruit trees are what's known as an attractive nuisance... if you harvested all that fruit most of the woodchucks would leave. Most mulberry trees produce fruit all summer, how can you in good conscience complain about woodchucks when it's you who are feeding them.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 20 Jun 2009 19:17:16 GMT, "brooklyn1"

Well, these mulberries, black and white, ripen in June and attract all kinds of creatures, even the carnivorous fox, but by July the fruit on the ground doesn't seem to be in great demand. They certainly do not produce fruit all summer. Cherries are later and are ubiquituous like weeds, all over the property, not just the east property line.
I'm not inclined to pile rocks or harvest the fruit but will continue as in the past to rely on the shotgun as well as a suggestion from one of the posters here: soaking fruit in anti-freeze.
That seems to be an excellent strategy.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Jun 20, 3:59�pm, snipped-for-privacy@here.org (Jack) wrote:

so how many birds and other animals will die a horrible painful death with your anti freeze fruit?
geez just live and let live, groundhogs are at most a nuisance.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

so how many birds and other animals will die a horrible painful death with your anti freeze fruit?
geez just live and let live, groundhogs are at most a nuisance.
======== Wait'll his antifreeze bait kills a neighbor's dog, he'll end up at the bottom of a pond strapped to a cement block, a meal for the snapping turtles, catfish, and carp. Shit happens.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 20 Jun 2009 23:27:38 GMT, "brooklyn1"

Nearest neighbor is 1/2 mile away.
If he has a dog, it would have to be a small dog to get his ass into a groundhog burrow. And if he does get into the burrow and consume the fruit and die, well ..... shit happens.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
bob haller wrote:

More than a nuisance. Did you read original post? Personally, I'd shoot them with a .22, set out Hav-a-hart traps and shoot or drown what I caught. Poison is iffy but I'd put it deep in the holes to keep other animals away. Practically any animal will eat rat poison coated with peanut butter.
BTW, young groundhog tastes like chicken.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Oh, please. They do not. They taste like ugly pork chops.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sat, 20 Jun 2009 17:34:54 -0700 (PDT), Pork Hop

It's been 40 or so years, but I always thought they reminded me of beef on chicken bones. Red, tender, juicy.
Jim
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

None.
The fruit goes into the hole.

Easy for you to say, PETA pussy.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
bob haller wrote:

bed around my deck trimmed back pretty well. He doesn't seem to like the groundcover plants or ferns very well. (No idea what the groundcover is- it has 2-tone green leaves.) Hey, not like I would ever get around to cleaning the bed out. I suppose he is also responsible for the mound of dirt at the back corner of the slab holding the old dog pen my shed sits in- guess I oughta attack that with a shovel before frost season, so the corner of the slab doesn't break off....
All in all, as neighbors go, I could do worse.
-- aem sends...
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

You'd need a lot of suction, they're pretty heavy. You'd probably have better luck with a fishing rod and some bananas.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Jack wrote:

Could be worse.
Years ago, when I was visiting the nature center at the Audubon Society of Western Pennsylvania, I ran across their semi-tame groundhog named "Harriet."
The Executive Director said: "You seem interested. Never seen a ground hog before?"
"No," I said. "We don't have them in my part of Texas. We DO, however, have armadillos."
"Heh," the director replied, "pretty much the same thing, I think."
"Tell ya what I'll do," I offered, "I'll trade you an armadillo for a ground hog!"
"GOOD GOD NO!," exclaimed the director. "No way, no how!"
"Uh, why not?"
"Can you even IMAGINE what would happen if a pair of our granny ladies, walking our nature trails, encountered an ARMADILLO?"
Aside: The director of public safety for Tennessee put out a press release not long ago telling motorists that the Texas Nine-Banded Armadillo had made its way into their state. The director cautioned motorists in Tennessee, if they see one on the highway, not to honk at it.
Armadillos, it seems, when startled, will jump straight up in the air about four feet. The motorist will then encounter the equivalent of a 16-pound bowling ball right at windshield level.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Jun 20, 8:48 am, snipped-for-privacy@Home.org (Jack) wrote:

You need to get yourself a badger.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Jack said:

Those groundhogs LOVE mulberry leaves. A young one got into the veggie garden once under the fence (since reinforced). What did it eat first? The leaves from the mulberry shoots growing up amidst the daylilies that run along the fence line. (It did not live to see the next sundown.)
--
Pat in Plymouth MI

"So, it was all a dream."
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In article

http://alternet.org/healthwellness/80868 /
Pollan: Nutrition 'Science' Has Hijacked Our Meals -- and Our Health
Like a lot of Americans, my understanding of nature and our relationship to it was shaped by Emerson and Thoreau and Melville and Whitman. When I actually started to garden, I realized all those ideas about the romance of nature were distinctly unhelpful. Thoreau's love of wilderness and worship of the wild really doesn't equip you when the pests come and destroy your crops, when the woodchuck attacks your broccoli.
I got into trouble following their philosophy. I didn't have a fence, for example. I thought a fence was too alienating from the natural world. I got into a war with a woodchuck -- just like Bill Murray in Caddyshack -- until I was defoliating my property and pouring gasoline down a woodchuck burrow. I was like William Westmoreland in Vietnam, willing to destroy the village to save it.
I realized then that the garden was a very interesting place to examine our relationship to the natural world. Traditionally when Americans want to think about nature, we picture the wilderness, we go camping, we go to Yosemite. But nature is happening in our homes, in our gardens, in our lawns, and on our plates.
--

- Billy

There are three kinds of men: The ones that learn by reading. The few who
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.